Books

All Different Now

All Different Now: Juneteenth, the First Day of Freedom

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Experience the joy of Juneteenth in this celebration of freedom from the award-winning team of Angela Johnson and E.B. Lewis. Through the eyes of one little girl, All Different Now tells the story of the first Juneteenth, the day freedom finally came to the last of the slaves in the South. Since then, the observance of June 19 as African American Emancipation Day has spread across the United States and beyond. This stunning picture book includes notes from the author and illustrator, a timeline of important dates, and a glossary of relevant terms. Told in Angela Johnson's signature melodic style and brought to life by E.B. Lewis's striking paintings, All Different Now is a joyous portrait of the dawn breaking on the darkest time in our nation's history. Author: Angela Johnson. Illustrator: E. B. Lewis. Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. Hardcover, 40 pages. Measures: 11.25" x 9.25". Weighs: 15.7 oz. 
Allies for Freedom & Blacks on John Brown

Allies for Freedom & Blacks on John Brown

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John Brown is an endlessly fascinating historical figure. Here are two classic studies by a pioneer in African American studies, one about the place of John Brown in African American history, the other about the reasons for the unique esteem in which he has been held by successive generations of blacks.This two-in-one edition features a new introduction by William S. McFeely, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Grant: A Biography. Author: Benjamin Quarles. Publisher: Da Capo Press. Paperback, 164 pages. Measures 5" x 8"x1.25". Weighs: 12.2 oz.
AMC's Best Day Hikes in the Shenandoah Valley: Four-Season Guide to 50 of the Best Trails From Harpers Ferry to Jefferson National Forest Second Edition

AMC's Best Day Hikes in the Shenandoah Valley: Four-Season Guide to 50 of the Best Trails From Harpers Ferry to Jefferson National Forest Second Edition

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Bounded on the east by the Blue Ridge Mountains and on the west by the Appalachians, the Shenandoah Valley is a region of exceptional natural beauty. This guide offers the best hikes that can be accomplished in the region in less than a day. Areas covered include Harper's Ferry, the North Virginia Piedmont, Shenandoah National Park, Jefferson National Forest, Massanuttens, Great North Mountain, and the Alleghenies. Hikes range from easy saunters of a few miles with little elevation gain, to challenging treks of over 10 miles through rugged terrain. Bearing evocative names such as Raven Rocks and Sky Meadows, Riprap Hollow and Devil's Marbleyard, the hikes in this book will get readers fired up for a trek into the Shenandoah wilds. Also Available: AMC's Best Backpacking in the Mid-Atlantic 978-1-934028-86-5 AMC's Best Day Hikes Near Washington, D.C. 978-1-934028-39-1. Publisher: Appalachian Mountain Club Books. Paperback, 232 Pages. Measures 9"x6"x0.5" . Weighs 14.7 oz.
American Civil War Action Figures Bucket

American Civil War Action Figures Bucket

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American civil war action figurines, includes bucket. Choking hazard, not for children under 3 years old. Bucket measures 6" x 6" x 4.75". Weighs 14.8 oz. 
American Civil War Guerrilla Tactics

American Civil War Guerrilla Tactics

$21.00
$21.00
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Osprey's examination of guerilla tactics employed during the American Civil War (1861-1865). While the giant armies of the Union and the Confederacy were fighting over cities and strategic strongholds, a large number of warriors from both sides were fighting, smaller, more personal battles. Beginning with the violent struggle known as "Bleeding Kansas," armed bands of irregular fighters began to wage war in every corner of the United States. Many of the names of their commanders have become legendary, including William Quantrill, "Bloody Bill" Anderson, and John S. Mosby, "The Grey Ghost." To their own people they were heroes; to others they were the first of a new generation of wild west outlaw. Their tactics including robbing banks and trains, kidnapping soldiers and civilians, rustling cattle, and cutting telegraph lines. In fact, it is during the violence of the war that many of America's future outlaw legends would be born, most notably Cole Younger and Frank and Jesse James. In this book, new Osprey author Sean McLachlan explores the varied and often daring tactics employed by these famous warriors. Publisher: Osprey Publishing. Paperback, 64 pages. Measures 7.25" x 9.75" x 0.1". Weighs 7.2 oz.
American Colonies: The Settling of North America

American Colonies: The Settling of North America

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A multicultural, multinational history of colonial America from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Internal Enemy and American Revolutions In the first volume in the Penguin History of the United States, edited by Eric Foner, Alan Taylor challenges the traditional story of colonial history by examining the many cultures that helped make America, from the native inhabitants from milennia past, through the decades of Western colonization and conquest, and across the entire continent, all the way to the Pacific coast. Transcending the usual Anglocentric version of our colonial past, he recovers the importance of Native American tribes, African slaves, and the rival empires of France, Spain, the Netherlands, and even Russia in the colonization of North America. Moving beyond the Atlantic seaboard to examine the entire continent, American Colonies reveals a pivotal period in the global interaction of peoples, cultures, plants, animals, and microbes. In a vivid narrative, Taylor draws upon cutting-edge scholarship to create a timely picture of the colonial world characterized by an interplay of freedom and slavery, opportunity and loss. "Formidable . . . provokes us to contemplate the ways in which residents of North America have dealt with diversity." -The New York Times Book Review Publisher: Penguin Books. Paperback, 526 pages. Measures 6.1" x 9.25" x 1.1". Weighs 1 lb 3.1 oz.
American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era

American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era

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"The ghosts of the Civil War never leave us, as David Blight knows perhaps better than anyone, and in this superb book he masterfully unites two distant but inextricably bound events."―Ken Burns Standing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963, a century after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, Martin Luther King, Jr., declared, "One hundred years later, the Negro still is not free." He delivered this speech just three years after the Virginia Civil War Commission published a guide proclaiming that "the Centennial is no time for finding fault or placing blame or fighting the issues all over again." David Blight takes his readers back to the centennial celebration to determine how Americans then made sense of the suffering, loss, and liberation that had wracked the United States a century earlier. Amid cold war politics and civil rights protest, four of America's most incisive writers explored the gulf between remembrance and reality. Robert Penn Warren, the southern-reared poet-novelist who recanted his support of segregation; Bruce Catton, the journalist and U.S. Navy officer who became a popular Civil War historian; Edmund Wilson, the century's preeminent literary critic; and James Baldwin, the searing African-American essayist and activist--each exposed America's triumphalist memory of the war. And each, in his own way, demanded a reckoning with the tragic consequences it spawned. Blight illuminates not only mid-twentieth-century America's sense of itself but also the dynamic, ever-changing nature of Civil War memory. On the eve of the 150th anniversary of the war, we have an invaluable perspective on how this conflict continues to shape the country's political debates, national identity, and sense of purpose. Publisher: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. Paperback, 314 pages. Measures 5.5" x 8.5" x 0.75". Weighs 15.7 oz. 
American Phoenix: A History of Storer College from Slavery to Desegregation

American Phoenix: A History of Storer College from Slavery to Desegregation

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In the first book-length study of Storer College, Dawne Raines Burke tells the story of the historically black institution from its Reconstruction origins to its demise in 1955. Established by Northern Baptists in the abolitionist flashpoint of Harpers Ferry, Storer was the first college open to African Americans in West Virginia, and it played a central role in regional and national history. In addition to educating generations of students of all races, genders, and creeds, Storer served as the second meeting place (and the first on U.S. soil) for the Niagara Movement, a precursor to the National Association for the Adavancement of Colored People. An American Phoenix provides a comprehensive and extensively illustrated history of this historically black college, bringing to life not just the institution but many of the individuals who taught or were educated there. It fills a significant gap in our knowledge of African American history and the struggle for rights in West Virginia and the wider world. Publisher: Storer College Books. Hardcover, 151 pages. Measures 11.25" x 0.5" x 9.25". Weighs 35.9 oz.
Antietam South Mountain & Harpers Ferry A Battlefield Guide

Antietam South Mountain & Harpers Ferry A Battlefield Guide

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In September 1862 the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and the Union Army of the Potomac conducted one of the truly great campaigns of the Civil War. At South Mountain, Harpers Ferry, and Antietam, North and South clashed in engagements whose magnitude and importance would earn this campaign a distinguished place in American military history. The siege of Harpers Ferry produced the largest surrender of U.S. troops in the nation's history until World War II, while the day-long battle at Antietam on September 17 still holds the distinction of being the single bloodiest day of combat in American history. This invaluable book provides a clear, convenient, stop-by-stop guide to the sites in Maryland and West Virginia associated with the Antietam campaign, including excursions to Harpers Ferry and South Mountain. Thorough descriptions and analyses, augmented with vignettes and numerous maps, convey the mechanics as well as the human experience of the campaign, making this book the perfect companion for both serious students of the Civil War and casual visitors to its battlefields. Publisher: University of Nebraska. Paperback, 264 Pages. Measures 9"x5.9"x0.5" . Weighs 14.1 oz.
Appalachia: A History

Appalachia: A History

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Interweaving social, political, environmental, economic, and popular history, John Alexander Williams chronicles four and a half centuries of the Appalachian past. Along the way, he explores Appalachia's long-contested boundaries and the numerous, often contradictory images that have shaped perceptions of the region as both the essence of America and a place apart.Williams begins his story in the colonial era and describes the half-century of bloody warfare as migrants from Europe and their American-born offspring fought and eventually displaced Appalachia's Native American inhabitants. He depicts the evolution of a backwoods farm-and-forest society, its divided and unhappy fate during the Civil War, and the emergence of a new industrial order as railroads, towns, and extractive industries penetrated deeper and deeper into the mountains. Finally, he considers Appalachia's fate in the twentieth century, when it became the first American region to suffer widespread deindustrialization, and examines the partial renewal created by federal intervention and a small but significant wave of in-migration.Throughout the book, a wide range of Appalachian voices enlivens the analysis and reminds us of the importance of storytelling in the ways the people of Appalachia define themselves and their region. Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press. Paperback, 473 pages. Measures 5.75" x 9.25" x 1.25". Weighs 1 lb 7.9 oz.