Books

HFPA Tee Small

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Hiking Medallion HFNHP Jefferson

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Historical Sketch of Camp Hill-Wesley Methodist Church Harpers Ferry,West Virginia

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This study examines the orgins and development of the Camp Hill-Wesley United Methodist Church. Published by the Harpers ferry Historical Association in 1996.Paperback, 152 pages
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Historically African American Leisure Destinations Around Washington D.C.

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Home on the Canal

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This richly illustrated and engagingly written book tells the story of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal from its origins in George Washington's decision to link the nation's new capital with the western frontier; through the beginning of construction in 1828 (fatefully, on the same day that the cornerstone of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad was set); to the "completion" of the project. Planned to go as far as Ohio and to take twelve years in construction, the Canal company's ambitions were scaled back after 22 years of toil, $14 million in expense, and the bankruptcy of several contractors took them only as far as Cumberland, at the eastern shed of the Alleghenies.

Describing in detail how the C&O operated in its heyday, Elizabeth Kytle takes the story through the shut-down of operations in 1924, after the Canal was purchased by its competitor, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and the efforts that resulted in its preservation as a National Historical Park in 1971. Enriching this narrative, the book also provides oral history accounts of eleven men and women who worked on or grew up along the banks of the Canal.

Hopewell Furnace DVD

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Images of America African Americans of Jefferson County

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Jefferson County can proudly claim a large number of firsts when it comes to African Americans in national history. The raid to free slaves that served as a catalyst for the Civil War was led by abolitionist John Brown in Harpers Ferry. The first man wounded in the rebellion was Heyward Shepherd, a free African American and a Jefferson County resident. Pres. Abraham Lincoln appointed Jefferson County native Martin Robison Delany as the first African American field officer of the Civil War. In 1906, the Niagara Movement, forerunner to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), held its first meeting on American soil on the Storer College campus. The first woman to become the coach of a menÂ’s college basketball team was also an African American from Jefferson County. Additionally, the Colored Horse Show held in Charles Town was the first of its kind for African Americans.

In the Watchfires: The Loudoun County Emancipation Association, 1890-1971

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Jefferson's View Ornament

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Made in the USA, this procelain ornament is ready to hang. Pictured is the view of The Gap seen from Jefferson's Rock. Measures 2.25" x 3.25".

Jenga National Parks

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John Brown 1859 Raid Tee Small

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John Brown Photo Chronology Catalog of the Exhibition at Harpers Ferry 2009

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John Brown used photographs to raise funds and recruit followers to fight for liberation of slaves.
Since publication and exhibition in 2009 there are new discoveries of a John Brown daguerreotype and a tintype. There were sixteen original portrait sittings. This full-color catalog of the exhibition with supplement adds many historic details and context of his life and movements.

Most of Brown's his original portraits were daguerreotypes. The prints are as close as possible to the original source, resulting in detail that is astonishing when compared with the familiar renditions in textbooks and the Internet.
Abolitionist and Free-State emigration to Kansas sponsors of several of the sittings wanted to utilize his charismatic force evident in the new medium.

The author/curator describes the practices of photography at the time, such as painted photographs, photographs projected onto canvas, as well as making reproducible negatives from the single-image daguerreotype with original photography copyright.

Association of some photographers with the Underground Railroad shows compelling evidence of John Brown s motivation and actions. Others were inventors and creators of new processes and techniques, which John Brown eagerly adapted, just as he wanted the newest weapons
Major collections of John Brown papers and artifacts are described by historians and archivists for readers who want to look for John Brown in their travels or research, and online. The definitive aspect of the exhibition and catalog is the dispersal of the early photographs into many institutional collections, which in turn copyright and reproduce them. This process is respected.

The catalog is revised with ten supplementary pages based on new research in September 2014.

John Brown to James Brown: The Little Farm Where Liberty Budded, Blossomed, and Boogied

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John Brown to James Brown delves into a distinctively American saga as it unfolds on one small piece of farm property in rural Western Maryland. Commonly known as John Brown's Farm because of the role it played in John Brown's raid on the armory at Harpers Ferry, this site was a music mecca to many young African Americans during the 50s and 60s. The little-known story of the music scene at Kennedy Farm where many giants of rhythm and blues performed during their early years --including James Brown, Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye, the Drifters, and scores of others. These stories, intertwined with those of a gifted promoter and thousands of young people who experienced early R&B music at John Brown's Farm, bring to life an ideal that heralded in America's founding documents and still beats in the heart of mankind today---liberty! Hardback 295 pages

John Brown's Raid Handbook

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Revised in 2009, this handbook contains the day-by-day narration of Brown’s insurrection, those who were involved, details of the trial, and what happened to John Brown and his men after the raid. Published on the 150th anniversary of the raid, more than a hundred photographs, maps and historic images chronicle the account. Includes suggested reading.  Paperback, 111 pages.

John Brown's Spy: The Adventurous Life and Tragic Confesstion of John E. Cook

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John Brown's Spy tells the nearly unknown story of John E. Cook, the person John Brown trusted most with the details of his plans to capture the Harper's Ferry armory in 1859. Cook was a poet, a marksman, a boaster, a dandy, a fighter, and a womanizer--as well as a spy. In a life of only thirty years, he studied law in Connecticut, fought border ruffians in Kansas, served as an abolitionist mole in Virginia, took white hostages during the Harper's Ferry raid, and almost escaped to freedom. For ten days after the infamous raid, he was the most hunted man in America with a staggering $1,000 bounty on his head.

Tracking down the unexplored circumstances of John Cook's life and disastrous end, Steven Lubet is the first to uncover the full extent of Cook's contributions to Brown's scheme. Without Cook's participation, the author contends, Brown might never have been able to launch the insurrection that sparked the Civil War. Had Cook remained true to the cause, history would have remembered him as a hero. Instead, when Cook was captured and brought to trial, he betrayed John Brown and named fellow abolitionists in a full confession that earned him a place in history's tragic pantheon of disgraced turncoats.

Keychain HFNHP Jefferson

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Lewis Art Poster

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In 1803, Meriwether Lewis visited the U.S. Armory and Arsenal at Harpers Ferry to obtain guns and hardware. He procured rifles, powder horns, pipe tomahawks, knives, and a collapsible iron-frame boat to supply his transcontinental expedition. This poster was printed to celebrate the 2003 commemoration of Lewis’ visit to Harpers Ferry. The approximate measurements of the poster is 14” x 20”.

Lewis Photo Poster

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In 1803, Meriwether Lewis visited the U.S. Armory and Arsenal at Harpers Ferry to obtain guns and hardware. He procured rifles, powder horns, pipe tomahawks, knives, and a collapsible iron-frame boat to supply his transcontinental expedition. This poster was printed to celebrate the 2003 commemoration of Lewis’ visit to Harpers Ferry. Poster measures 16"x20". Includes a list of the inventory pictured such as tools for repairing the arms, fish gigs, etc.
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Life in Civil War America

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The Civil War is a fascinating time period in American history. Life in Civil War America, 2nd Edition provides readers with fast facts and statistics about the 1860s from military life to civilian life in both the North and South.

Topics covered include:

  • social and economic realities of daily life
  • common slang and idioms
  • diets of the era, including recipes, food preparation and the impact of shortages and inflation on rations
  • civilian dress, military dress, and technology of the time.
  • The book focuses on the era, not just the events of the war. Period illustrations and photos further illuminate the era.

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    Lincoln and Emancipation

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    In this succinct study, Edna Greene Medford examines the ideas and events that shaped President Lincoln's responses to slavery, following the arc of his ideological development from the beginning of the Civil War, when he aimed to pursue a course of noninterference, to his championing of slavery's destruction before the conflict ended. Throughout, Medford juxtaposes the president's motivations for advocating freedom with the aspirations of African Americans themselves, restoring African Americans to the center of the story about the struggle for their own liberation.

    Lincoln and African Americans, Medford argues, approached emancipation differently, with the president moving slowly and cautiously in order to save the Union while the enslaved and their supporters pressed more urgently for an end to slavery. Despite the differences, an undeclared partnership existed between the president and slaves that led to both preservation of the Union and freedom for those in bondage. Medford chronicles Lincoln's transition from advocating gradual abolition to campaigning for immediate emancipation for the majority of the enslaved, a change effected by the military and by the efforts of African Americans. The author argues that many players--including the abolitionists and Radical Republicans, War Democrats, and black men and women--participated in the drama through agitation, military support of the Union, and destruction of the institution from within. Medford also addresses differences in the interpretation of freedom: Lincoln and most Americans defined it as the destruction of slavery, but African Americans understood the term to involve equality and full inclusion into American society. An epilogue considers Lincoln's death, African American efforts to honor him, and the president's legacy at home and abroad.

    Both enslaved and free black people, Medford demonstrates, were fervent participants in the emancipation effort, showing an eagerness to get on with the business of freedom long before the president or the North did. By including African American voices in the emancipation narrative, this insightful volume offers a fresh and welcome perspective on Lincoln's America.

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    Lincoln Lessons: Reflections on America's Greatest Leader

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    In Lincoln Lessons, seventeen of today's most respected academics, historians, lawyers, and politicians provide candid reflections on the importance of Abraham Lincoln in their intellectual lives. Their essays, gathered by editors Frank J. Williams and William D. Pederson, shed new light on this political icon's remarkable ability to lead and inspire two hundred years after his birth.
    Collected here are glimpses into Lincoln's unique ability to transform enemies into steadfast allies, his deeply ingrained sense of morality and intuitive understanding of humanity, his civil deification as the first assassinated American president, and his controversial suspension of habeas corpus during the Civil War. The contributors also discuss Lincoln's influence on today's emerging democracies, his lasting impact on African American history, and his often-overlooked international legend--his power to instigate change beyond the boundaries of his native nation. While some contributors provide a scholarly look at Lincoln and some take a more personal approach, all explore his formative influence in their lives. What emerges is the true history of his legacy in the form of first-person testaments from those whom he has touched deeply.
    Lincoln Lessons brings together some of the best voices of our time in a unique combination of memoir and history. This singular volume of original essays is a tribute to the enduring inspirational powers of an extraordinary man whose courage and leadership continue to change lives today.
    Contributors
    Jean H. Baker
    Mario M. Cuomo
    Joan L. Flinspach
    Sara Vaughn Gabbard
    Doris Kearns Goodwin
    Harold Holzer
    Harry V. Jaffa
    John F. Marszalek
    James M. McPherson
    Edna Greene Medford
    Sandra Day O'Connor
    Mackubin Thomas Owens
    William D. Pederson
    Edward Steers Jr.
    Craig L. Symonds
    Thomas Reed Turner
    Frank J. Williams


    MAGNET 75th Anniversary Button Style

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    MAGNET HFPA Logo

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    Meet Us at the National Parks

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    This colorful story portrays some of the fun activities waiting for visitors at the U.S. national parks, monuments, lakeshores, etc. Kids can reference the back cover to see which park is nearest to them and map out their next national park adventure. Features over 120 sites!Hardcover with dust jacket, 32 pages

    Mennen's Ad Tee

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    The faded painting on the face of Maryland Heights was an early 1900s advertisement aimed at passengers on the B&O Railroad, which was a heavily traveled rail line. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, painting advertisements on brick buildings and stone cliffs was very popular. As transportation shifted to roads and automobiles, advertisements moved to billboards and highways. Many local residents believed it to be a “desecration of nature”, so in 1963 volunteers from the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club scaled the cliff and attempted to eradicate the ad with paint remover and carbon black. Four years later, the sign was visible once again and has since been left alone.
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    More Than Freedom Fighting for Black Citizenship in a White Republic, 1829-1889

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    "A major new narrative account of the long struggle of Northern activists-both black and white, famous and obscure-to establish African Americans as free citizens, from abolitionism through the Civil War, Reconstruction, and its demise "

    Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation is generally understood as the moment African Americans became free, and Reconstruction as the ultimately unsuccessful effort to extend that victory by establishing equal citizenship. In "More Than Freedom," award-winning historian Stephen Kantrowitz boldly redefines our understanding of this entire era by showing that the fight to abolish slavery was always part of a much broader campaign to establish full citizenship for African Americans and find a place to belong in a white republic.

    "More Than Freedom" chronicles this epic struggle through the lived experiences of black and white activists in and around Boston, including both famous reformers such as Frederick Douglass and Charles Sumner and lesser-known but equally important figures like the journalist William Cooper Nell and the ex-slaves Lewis and Harriet Hayden. While these freedom fighters have traditionally been called abolitionists, their goals and achievements went far beyond emancipation. They mobilized long before they had white allies to rely on and remained militant long after the Civil War ended.

    These black freedmen called themselves "colored citizens" and fought to establish themselves in American public life, both by building their own networks and institutions and by fiercely, often violently, challenging proslavery and inegalitarian laws and prejudice. But as Kantrowitz explains, they also knew that until the white majority recognized them as equal participants in common projects they would remain a suspect class. Equal citizenship meant something far beyond freedom: not only full legal and political rights, but also acceptance, inclusion and respect across the color line.

    Even though these reformers ultimately failed to remake the nation in the way they hoped, their struggle catalyzed the arrival of Civil War and left the social and political landscape of the Union forever altered. Without their efforts, war and Reconstruction could hardly have begun. Bringing a bold new perspective to one of our nation's defining moments, "More Than Freedom" helps to explain the extent and the limits of the so-called freedom achieved in 1865 and the legacy that endures today.

    Mug Harpers Ferry Mix

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    8oz mug featuring a mix of iconic Harpers Ferry imagery.

    MUG HFNHP 75th Anniversary

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    MUG HFPA Electric Blue

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    MUG HFPA Night Sky

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    My Folks Don't Want Me to Talk About Slavery

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    In the midst of the Great Depression, the Federal Writer's Project assigned field workers to interview ex-slaves. More than 2,000 former slaves contributed their personal accounts and opinions, and their oral histories were deposited in the Library of Congress.

    The former slaves describe the clothes they wore, the food they ate, the houses they lived in, the type of work they did, and the treatment they received. They tell their impressions of Yankee soldiers, the Klan, their masters, and their new-found freedom.

    Because the interviews were conducted during the Great Depression, some of the narratives provide insights that are at times surprising. These interviews have preserved a valuable source of information about the institution of slavery in the United States and the effect it had on the people involved.

    "One day Grandpappy sassed Miss Polly White, and she told him that if he didn't behave hisself that she would put him in her pocket. Grandpappy was a big man, and I ask him how Miss Polly could do that. He said she meant that she would sell him, then put the money in her pocket. He never did sass Miss Polly no more."--Sarah Debro

    These eloquent words come from former slaves themselves--an important but long-neglected source of information about the institution of slavery in the United States. Who could better describe what slavery was like than the people who experienced it? And describe it they did, in thousands of remarkable interviews sponsored by the Federal Writers Project during the 1930's

    Over 2,000 slave narratives that are now housed in the Library of Congress. More than 170 interviews were conducted in North Carolina. Belinda Hurmence pored over each of the North Carolina narratives, compiling and editing 21 of the first-person accounts for this collection.

    These narratives, though artless in many ways, speak compellingly of the joys and sorrows, the hopes and dreams, of the countless people who endured human bondage in the land of the free.

    National Parks Coloring Book

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    Treasury of detailed, ready-to-color illustrations depicting typical scenes from 50 U.S. national parks: Grand Canyon, Everglades, Great Smoky Mountains, Mammoth Cave, Petrified Forest, and more. Informative captions describe distinguishing features of each park, flora and fauna, visitor activities available, more. Useful guide to major attractions. 50 black-and-white illustrations.

    Niagara Movement Commemoration Pin

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    Niagara Movement Commemorative Program

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    Issued during the August 2006 event on the Storer College campus, this program gives you a history of the formation of the Niagara Movement. Listed is the daily schedule for the three day event along with biographies and colored photographs of the honored guests, speakers and performers. Paperback, 20 pages.

    Niagara Movement Educator's Guide CD-ROM

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    Explore the meaning of the Niagara Movement and it's historic meeting at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.

    Niagara Movement Postcard

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    Niagara Movement Silver Medallion

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    This is a custom medallion encased in plastic from the Northwest Territorial Mint which comes with a certificate of authenticity that lists the specifications of the following: *Assay .999 Fine Silver *Weight 1 troy Ounce*Size 39mm*Thickness 2.9mm*Strike ProofA velvet lined case for safe keeping is included.

    Niagara Unframed Photograph 11x14

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    Photographed August 20, 2006, on the third day of celebration to honor those who had gathered 100 years before.This photograph was taken to memorialize the centennial of the Niagara Movement in Harpers Ferry, WV. Those that gathered to have their picture taken were duplicating what the original members had done during their 1906 conference. Available unframed size 11” x 14”.

    Niagara Unframed Photograph 8x10

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    Photographed August 20, 2006, on the third day of celebration to honor those who had gathered 100 years before.This photograph was taken to memorialize the centennial of the Niagara Movement in Harpers Ferry, WV. Those that gathered to have their picture taken were duplicating what the original members had done during their 1906 conference. Available unframed size 8” x 10”
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    Night Boat to Freedom

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    When Granny Judith asks twelve-year-old Christmas John to row Molly, cook's daughter, across the river from Kentucky to the Free State of Ohio, he's terrified. Bravely, he begins the first of many journeys. Each time he returns, Granny Judith asks what color clothing his passenger wore, for she's had a dream-vision and is making a quilt from squares of these "freedom colors." When there are only two squares left, she tells him, "Dream says we got to get ourselves over the river, 'cause the danger's gonna grow awful."
    This compelling story, powerfully and poignantly illustrated, is a memorable celebration of courage, hope, and unselfish love. "Night Boat to Freedom" is a 2007 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

    Northern Cardinal

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    Plush squeeze bird which sounds off the real bird call. Enjoyment for kids and adults alike. 4.00 inches tall x 4.25 inches long x 7.00 inches wide.

    Of Sugar and Snow A History of Ice Cream Making

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    Was ice cream invented in Philadelphia? How about by the Emperor Nero, when he poured honey over snow? Did Marco Polo first taste it in China and bring recipes back? In this first book to tell ice cream's full story, Jeri Quinzio traces the beloved confection from its earliest appearances in sixteenth-century Europe to the small towns of America and debunks some colorful myths along the way. She explains how ice cream is made, describes its social role, and connects historical events to its business and consumption. A diverting yet serious work of history, Of Sugar and Snow provides a fascinating array of recipes, from a seventeenth-century Italian lemon sorbet to a twentieth-century American strawberry mallobet, and traces how this once elite status symbol became today's universally available and wildly popular treat.

    On This Day in West Virginia Civil War History

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    West Virginia is the only state formed by seceding from a Confederate state. And its connections to the Civil War run deep. One day at a time, award-winning historian Michael Graham presents intriguing, event-driven anecdotes and history related to the state. On July 11, 1861, a Union force attacked 1,300 Confederate troops camped at Rich Mountain in a renowned battle. Confederate guerrillas raided Hackers Creek on June 12, 1864. Find little-known facts about the Battles of Droop Mountain, Carnifex Ferry, Harpers Ferry, Shepherdstown and a whole host of others. Read a story one day or month at a time. Celebrate an entire year of Civil War history in the Mountain State.

    ORNAMENT HFNHP Blue Heron

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    Park Ranger Doll

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    Surface washable Did you know that park rangers have important jobs taking care of our forests and parks? They spot forest fires and help put them out. They transport injured animals to wildlife clinics for treatment. Park rangers enforce laws and park regulations. They can even give guided tours of our parks. Doll 11". Surface washable.

    PATCH 75th Anniversary

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    Patch Harpers Ferry Heritage Trail

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    Consider awarding your scout troop with this trail patch or just add to your collection. Fusible. Measures 4” x 3 ½”

    PIN 75th Anniversary

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    Pin Storer College Seal

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    Storer College seal, reproduced from original artwork by Louise Wood Brackett.

    Pin with Ribbon Niagara Movement Lapel

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    This ribbon replicates the ribbons worn in 1906 by the Niagarites. Both pin and ribbon commemorate the Niagara Movement centennial August 18-20, 2006. Ribbon measures approximately 6”x2”. The lapel pin measures 1” diameter.