Women's Biography

Belle Boyd in Camp and Prison

Belle Boyd in Camp and Prison

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First published in 1865, Belle Boyd's memoir of her experiences as a Confederate spy has stood the test of time and interest. Belle first gained notoriety when she killed a Union soldier in her home in 1861. During the Federal occupations of the Shenandoah Valley, she mingled with the servicemen and, using her feminine wiles, obtained useful information for the Rebel cause. In this new edition, Kennedy-Nolle and Faust consider the domestic side of the Civil War and also assess the value of Boyd's memoir for social and literary historians in its challenge to our understanding the most divisive years in American history. Publisher: Louisiana State University Press. Paperback, 288 Pages. Measures 8.4"x5.5"x0.6" . Weighs 12.1 oz. 
Burying the Dead But Not the Past

Burying the Dead But Not the Past

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Immediately after the Civil War, white women across the South organized to retrieve the remains of Confederate soldiers. In Virginia alone, these Ladies' Memorial Associations (LMAs) relocated and reinterred the remains of more than 72,000 soldiers. Challenging the notion that southern white women were peripheral to the Lost Cause movement until the 1890s, Caroline Janney restores these women as the earliest creators and purveyors of Confederate tradition. Long before national groups such as the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the United Daughters of the Confederacy were established, Janney shows, local LMAs were earning sympathy for defeated Confederates. Her exploration introduces new ways in which gender played a vital role in shaping the politics, culture, and society of the late nineteenth-century South. Publisher: University of North Carolina Press. Paperback, 280 Pages. Measures 9.1" x 6.1" x 0.75" . Weighs 15.4 oz.
Diary from Dixie: A Journal of the Confederacy, 1860-1865 (Thrift Edition)

Diary from Dixie: A Journal of the Confederacy, 1860-1865 (Thrift Edition)

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Born into Southern aristocracy, Mary Boykin Chesnut (1823-86) married a rising star of the political scene who ultimately served as an aide to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. As a prominent hostess and popular guest in the highest circles of Confederate society, Chesnut possessed an insider's perspective on many of the Civil War's major events, which she recorded in vivid journal entries. Her diary recounts the social life that struggled to continue in the midst of war, the grim economic conditions that resulted from blockaded ports as well as how people's spirits rose and fell with each victory and defeat. Hailed by William Styron as "a great epic drama of our greatest national tragedy," Chesnut's annotated diary won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1982 and served as a primary source for Ken Burns's celebrated Civil War documentary. This edition of the compelling narrative features photos and engravings from the original publication. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 323 Pages. Measures 8"x5"x0.75" . Weighs 8.9 oz.
Dr. Mary Walker's Civil War: One Woman's Journey to the Medal of Honor and the Fight for Women's Rights

Dr. Mary Walker's Civil War: One Woman's Journey to the Medal of Honor and the Fight for Women's Rights

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"I will always be somebody." This assertion, a startling one from a nineteenth-century woman, drove the life of Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, the only American woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor. President Andrew Johnson issued the award in 1865 in recognition of the incomparable medical service Walker rendered during the Civil War. Yet few people today know anything about the woman so well-known--even notorious--in her own lifetime. Theresa Kaminski shares a different way of looking at the Civil War, through the eyes of a woman confident she could make a contribution equal to that of any man. She takes readers into the political cauldron of the nation's capital in wartime, where Walker was a familiar if notorious figure. Mary Walker's relentless pursuit of gender and racial equality is key to understanding her commitment to a Union victory in the Civil War. Her role in the women's suffrage movement became controversial and the US Army stripped Walker of her medal, only to have the medal reinstated posthumously in 1977. Publisher: Lyons Press. Hardcover, 312 pages. Measures 6.2" x 9.25" x 1". Weighs 1 lb 8.4 oz.
Genteel Rebel: The Life of Mary Greenhow Lee

Genteel Rebel: The Life of Mary Greenhow Lee

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This elegantly written biography depicts the combined effect of social structure, character, and national crisis on a woman's life. Mary Greenhow Lee (1819-1907) was raised in a privileged Virginia household. As a young woman, she flirted with President Van Buren's son, drank tea with Dolley Madison, and frolicked in bedsheets through the streets of Washington with her sister-in-law, future Confederate spy Rose O'Neal Greenhow. Later in life, Lee debated with senators, fed foreign emissaries and correspondents, scolded generals, and nursed soldiers. As a Confederate sympathizer in the hotly contested small border town of Winchester, Virginia, she ran an underground postal service, hid contraband under her nieces' dresses, abetted the Rebel cause, and was finally banished. Lee's personal history is an intriguing story. It is also an account of the complex social relations that characterized nineteenth-century life. She was an elite southern woman who knew the rules but who also flouted and other times flaunted the prevailing gender arrangements. Her views on status suggest that the immeasurable markers of prestige were much more important than wealth in her social stratum. She had strong ideas about who was (or was not) her "equal," yet she married a man of quite modest means. Lee's biography also enlarges our view of Confederate patriotism, revealing a war within a war and divisions arising as much from politics and geography as from issues of slavery and class. Mary Greenhow Lee was a woman of her time and place -- one whose youthful rebellion against her society's standards yielded to her desire to preserve that society's way of life. Genteel Rebel illustrates the value of biography as history as it narrates the eventful life of a surprisingly powerful southern lady. Publisher: Lousiana State University. Paperback, 259 Pages. Measures 8.75"x5.75"x0.5" . Weighs 13.1 oz.
Great Poems by American Women: An Anthology

Great Poems by American Women: An Anthology

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From the colonial-era poets to such twentieth-century writers as Marianne Moore and Sylvia Plath, this inspiring anthology offers a retrospective of more than three centuries of poems by American women. Over 200 selections embrace a wide range of themes and motifs: meditations on the meaning of existence, celebrations of life's joys, appreciations of the natural world, and many more. "To My Dear and Loving Husband," written by America's first poet of note, Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), appears here, along with "On Imagination," by Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784), America's first great black woman poet. Selections also include more than a dozen beloved works by Emily Dickinson as well as masterly verses by Hilda Doolittle, Gwendolyn Brooks, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Amy Lowell, Emma Lazarus, and numerous lesser-known authors. A superb introduction to America's women poets, this engaging collection offers an inexpensive and rewarding resource for students, teachers, and all lovers of fine poetry. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 238 Pages. Measures 8"x5"x0.6" . Weighs 6.6 oz.
Great Speeches by American Women

Great Speeches by American Women

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From civil rights to the right to vote, women have spoken up and spoken out throughout American history. Brimming with great power and eloquence, here are twenty-one legendary speeches from the country's most inspirational female voices, including Jane Addams, Emma Goldman, and Hillary Rodham Clinton. Spanning the centuries from 1851 to 2007, these are the rousing words that continue to endure in our nation's consciousness. This distinguished collection includes these American women and their speeches: Sojourner Truth, "Ain't I a Woman?" 1851; Susan B. Anthony, "On Behalf of the Woman Suffrage Amendment," 1880; Margaret Sanger, "A Moral Necessity of Birth Control," 1921; Mary McLeod Bethune, "A Century of Progress of Negro Women," 1933; Eleanor Roosevelt, "On the Adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights," 1948; Shirley Chisholm, "People and Peace, Not Profits and War," 1969; Geraldine Ferraro, "Vice Presidential Nomination Acceptance Address," 1984; Gloria Steinem, "A Twenty-First Century Feminism," 2002; Nancy Pelosi, "Speech Upon Her Election as Speaker of the House," 2007, and many more unforgettable speeches by spirited and influential American women. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 180 Pages. Measures 8"x5"x0.5" . Weighs 5 oz.
Great Women of the Civil War

Great Women of the Civil War

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Imagine dodging bullets as you rush to help a wounded soldier on a battlefield. Or hiding secret messages in your skirt and sneaking across enemy lines. Women did these things and more during the American Civil War. Some worked as nurses or spies, while others were abolitionists, authors or preachers. But whatever their job, these women fought for what they believed in. Learn about the efforts of these brave women, and open your eyes to the impact women made in the Civil War. Publisher: Capstone Press. Paperback, 32 pages. Measures 7.5" x 8.75". Weighs 3.4 oz. 
Harriet Tubman: The Moses of Her People

Harriet Tubman: The Moses of Her People

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This simple, unvarnished account recalls the courageous life of Harriet Tubman, one of the best-known "conductors" on the Underground Railroad. First published in 1869 and privately printed to raise funds for "the Moses of her people," Sarah Bradford's memorable biography recalls the former slave's grim childhood; her perilous experiences leading slaves into Canada; her efforts as a Civil War nurse, cook, and scout for the Union Army; and her post-conflict endeavors to aid and educate former slaves. An inspiring story of bravery, perseverance, and self-sacrifice, this accurate, reliable account by Tubman's contemporary is essential reading for students of American history and African-American studies. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 81 pages. Measures 5.5" x 8.5" x 0.2". Weighs 5.1 oz.
In the Shadow of the Enemy: The Civil War Journal of Ida Powell Dulany

In the Shadow of the Enemy: The Civil War Journal of Ida Powell Dulany

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The mistress of a slave-holding estate, Ida Powell Dulany took over control of the extensive family lands once her husband left to fight for the Confederacy. She struggled to manage slaves, maintain contact with her neighbors, and keep up her morale after her region was abandoned by the Confederate government soon after the beginning of hostilities. More than just an elegantly written account of her own day-to-day experiences in the Civil War, Ida's journal opens a window into the Southern culture of the time. Stevan F. Meserve has written extensively for several Civil War publications and is the author of The Civil War in Loudoun County, Virginia: A History of Hard Times. Anne Mackall Sasscer grew up on Selby, a family farm near The Plains, Virginia, the home of Ida Powell Dulany's youngest daughter. Mary LeJeune Mackall spent her early years at Blenheim, a pre-Revolutionary farm near Charlottesville, which inspired her lifelong interest in Virginia history. Publisher: University of Tennesse Press. Paperback, 272 Pages. Measures 8.8"x6"x0.6" . Weighs 14.7 oz.