Cookbooks, Food History

Harpers Ferry Bill of Fare Collection of Recipes by the HFHA

Harpers Ferry Bill of Fare Collection of Recipes by the HFHA

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A collection of recipes influenced by the confluence! Take a journey back into time with your tastebuds from the late 18th century to present day! Enjoy images of Harpers Ferry past, colorful quotes, and amusing anecdotes. Filled with both historical and modern recipes, Harpers Ferry Bill of Fare will satisfy any appetite for food or nostalgia. Spiral bound, paperback 92 pages.
American Cookery

American Cookery

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Published in Hartford in 1796, this volume in the American Antiquarian Cookbook Collection is a facsimile edition of one of the most important documents in American culinary history. This is the first cookbook written by an American author specifically published for American kitchens.

Named by the Library of Congress as one of the 88 "Books That Shaped America," American Cookery was the first cookbook by an American author published in the United States. Until its publication, cookbooks printed and used by American colonists were British. As indicated in Amelia Simmons's subtitle, the recipes in her book were "adapted to this country," reflecting the fact that American cooks had learned to make do with what was available in North America. This cookbook reveals the rich variety of food colonial Americans used, their tastes, cooking and eating habits, and even their rich, down-to-earth language.

Bringing together English cooking methods with truly American products, American Cookery contains the first known printed recipes substituting American maize for English oats; and the recipe for Johnny Cake is apparently the first printed version using cornmeal. The book also contains the first known recipe for turkey. Possibly the most far-reaching innovation was Simmons's use of pearlash--a staple in colonial households as a leavening agent in dough, which eventually led to the development of modern baking powders.

"Thus, twenty years after the political upheaval of the American Revolution of 1776, a second revolution--a culinary revolution--occurred with the publication of a cookbook by an American for Americans." (Jan Longone, curator of American Culinary History, University of Michigan)

This facsimile edition of Amelia Simmons's American Cookery was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the Society is a research library documenting the life of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. The Society collects, preserves, and makes available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection includes approximately 1,100 volumes.

Best of the Best from West Virginia Cookbook

Best of the Best from West Virginia Cookbook

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Treat your family to the down-home taste of Wild and Wonderful West Virginia! Here is an amazing collection of recipes—more than 350—from the Mountain State's favorite cookbooks featuring the likes of Cabbage Patch Supper, Southern Corn Pone, Roast Wild Turkey with Chestnut Stuffing and Mountain Momma Mudslide.

Why is this book so uniquely special? Fifty-seven of West Virginia's most popular cookbooks contributed their favorite recipes to this collection. A catalog section describes each contributing cookbook and explains how to order them. Photographs, illustrations, and interesting facts about the state take you on a tour of West Virginia. Recipes are tested, easy to follow, and taste wonderful!

Best of the Best from West Virginia Cookbook is the latest volume in the acclaimed Best of the Best State Cookbook Series. Over 1.3 million cookbooks in this Series have been sold.

Celebrating Our Equality: A Cookbook with Recipes and Remberances from Howard University

Celebrating Our Equality: A Cookbook with Recipes and Remberances from Howard University

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This companion to the bestselling "The African-American Heritage Cookbook" and "A Taste of Freedom" is a historic cookbook from Howard University, the country's oldest African-American college. Includes more than 150 mouthwatering recipes, historic vignettes about the school and illustious Howard alumnae and their contributions to the arts, political science and the law. Illustrated with vintage photographs.

Civil War Cookin', Stories, 'n Such

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Hearthside Cooking Early American Southern Cuisine Updated for Today's Heart & Coostove

Hearthside Cooking Early American Southern Cuisine Updated for Today's Heart & Coostove

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For cooks who want to experience a link to culinary history, Hearthside Cooking is a treasure trove of early American delights. First published in 1986, it has become a standard guide for museum interpreters and guides, culinary historians, historical re-enactors, campers, scouts, and home cooks interested in foodways and experimenting with new recipes and techniques.

Hearthside Cooking contains recipes for more than 250 historic dishes, including breads, soups, entrees, cakes, custards, sauces, and more. For each dish, Nancy Carter Crump provides two sets of instructions, so dishes can be prepared over the open fire or using modern kitchen appliances. For novice hearthside cooks, Crump offers specific tips for proper hearth cooking, including fire construction, safety, tools, utensils, and methods.

More than just a cookbook, Hearthside Cooking also includes information about the men and women who wrote the original recipes, which Crump discovered by scouring old Virginia cookbooks, hand-written receipt books, and other primary sources in archival collections. With this new edition, Crump includes additional information on African American foodways, how the Civil War affected traditional southern food customs, and the late-nineteenth-century transition from hearth to stove cooking. Hearthside Cooking offers twenty-first-century cooks an enjoyable, informative resource for traditional cooking.





Ices & Ice Creams

Ices & Ice Creams

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The ultimate ice cream collection, from Victorian culinary heroine and "Queen of Ices," Agnes Marshall

A delightful addition to the Cookery Classics series, this book contains more than 100 ice recipes from Marshall's classic Victorian Book of Ices, first published in 1885 and cited as an inspiration by Heston Blumenthal. Delights include thirst-quenching ice creams, sorbets, mousses, and iced souffles, with traditional flavors accompanied by such tempting recipes as burnt almond cream ice, tea cream ice, bergamot ice water, sorbet of peaches, maraschino mousse, chateaubriand bombe, plombiere of strawberries, Muscovite of oranges, and, for the particularly adventurous, souffles of curry a la Ripon. This edition also features culinary historian Barbara Ketcham Wheaton's annotations, updating each recipe for modern kitchens.

Much More than Beans & Cornbread Volume 2

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Of Sugar and Snow A History of Ice Cream Making

Of Sugar and Snow A History of Ice Cream Making

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Was ice cream invented in Philadelphia? How about by the Emperor Nero, when he poured honey over snow? Did Marco Polo first taste it in China and bring recipes back? In this first book to tell ice cream's full story, Jeri Quinzio traces the beloved confection from its earliest appearances in sixteenth-century Europe to the small towns of America and debunks some colorful myths along the way. She explains how ice cream is made, describes its social role, and connects historical events to its business and consumption. A diverting yet serious work of history, Of Sugar and Snow provides a fascinating array of recipes, from a seventeenth-century Italian lemon sorbet to a twentieth-century American strawberry mallobet, and traces how this once elite status symbol became today's universally available and wildly popular treat.

Refined Tastes: Sugar, Confectionary and Consumers in 19th Century America

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American consumers today regard sugar as a mundane and sometimes even troublesome substance linked to hyperactivity in children and other health concerns. Yet two hundred years ago American consumers treasured sugar as a rare commodity and consumed it only in small amounts. In Refined Tastes: Sugar, Confectionery, and Consumers in Nineteenth-Century America, Wendy A. Woloson demonstrates how the cultural role of sugar changed from being a precious luxury good to a ubiquitous necessity. Sugar became a social marker that established and reinforced class and gender differences.

During the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Woloson explains, the social elite saw expensive sugar and sweet confections as symbols of their wealth. As refined sugar became more affordable and accessible, new confections--children's candy, ice cream, and wedding cakes--made their way into American culture, acquiring a broad array of social meanings. Originally signifying male economic prowess, sugar eventually became associated with femininity and women's consumerism. Woloson's work offers a vivid account of this social transformation--along with the emergence of consumer culture in America.

Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book

Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book

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Based on Mrs. Lee's personal notebook and presented by her great-granddaughter, this charming book is a treasury of recipes, remedies, and household history. Both the original and modern versions of 70 recipes are included.

Seeking the Historical Cook Exploring Eighteenth-century Southern Foodways

Seeking the Historical Cook Exploring Eighteenth-century Southern Foodways

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Seeking the Historical Cook is a guide to historical cooking methods from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century receipt (recipe) books and an examination of how those methods can be used in kitchens today. Designed for adventurous cooks and �foodies,� this volume is rich with photographs, period images, and line art depicting kitchen tools and cooking methods. Kay K. Moss invites readers to discover traditional receipts and to experiment with ancestral dishes to brighten today�s meals.
From campfires to modern kitchens, Seeking the Historical Cook is a primer on interpreting the language of early receipts, a practical guide to historical techniques, and a memoir of experiences at historic hearths. Scores of sources, including more than a dozen unpublished personal cookery books, are compared and contrasted with a new look at southern foodways (eating habits and culinary practices). A rather strict interpretive and experiential approach is combined with a friendly and open invitation to the reader to join the ranks of curious cooks. Taken together, these receipts, facts, and lore illustrate the evolution of selected foods through the eighteenth century and beyond.
After decades of research, experimentation, and teaching in a variety of settings, Moss provides a hands-on approach to rediscovering, re-creating, and enjoying foods from the early South. The book begins by steeping the reader in history, culinary tools, and the common cooking techniques of the time. Then Moss presents a collection of tasteful and appealing southern ancestral receipts that can be fashioned into brilliant heirloom dishes for our twenty-first-century tables. There are dishes fit for a simple backwoods celebration or an elegant plantation feast, intriguing new possibilities for a modern Thanksgiving dinner, and even simple experiments for a school project or for sharing with a favorite child. This book is for the cook who wants to try something old . . . that is new again.
Clear Toy Candy All About the Traditional Holiday Treat with Steps for Making Your Own Candy

Clear Toy Candy All About the Traditional Holiday Treat with Steps for Making Your Own Candy

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For generations, children have received Christmas gifts of hard, sweet, crystal-clear edible shapes of red, green, and yellow animals, trains, ships, and other objects called clear toy candy. The candy is made from a solution of sugar, water, corn syrup, and food coloring. The shapes are formed when the hot solution is poured into molds in which the candy quickly hardens. This book provides tips and techniques for making the traditional candy, with information on ingredients, utensils, and the correct cooking conditions. A brief history of the candy and a discussion of the antique molds make this book essential for all who want to carry on this delightful winter holiday tradition.