Civil War

Mr. Lincolns Camera Man: Mathew B. Brady

Mr. Lincolns Camera Man: Mathew B. Brady

$27.95
More Info
Mathew Brady, one of the foremost early American photographers and one of the earliest war photographers, was official photographer for the Union Army in the Civil War. With his assistants and his horse-drawn photographic wagon, Brady accompanied the troops and recorded the war firsthand. His war pictures are among the greatest war photographs ever taken, and constitute a prized pictorial record of American history. A photographer much in demand by statesmen and celebrities, Brady amassed a gallery of distinguished portraits. Most famous of these is the Brady Lincoln, the photograph used for the engraving of the Lincoln head on the five-dollar bill. There are even photographs of Brady himself. But the heart of the book is the Civil War photographs: Battle Smoke, Union Wounded at Fredericksburg, Burnside's Bridge over the Antietam, Death of a Rebel Sniper, Remains of the Dead at Chancellorsville, Embalming Surgeon at Work, Atlanta Ga. Just After Its Capture, and others. Meredith's text tells the story behind many of the photographs and gives a lively account of Brady's life and times. In this Dover edition almost all the photographic prints have been reproduced directly from negatives and photographs on file at the Library of Congress -- they are sharper and clearer than the reproductions in the first edition; numbers for all negatives are now included -- a great boon to Brady picture research; and corrections have been made in the attributions of some of the photographs. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 368 pages. Measures 8.4" x 11.25" x 0.6". Weighs 2 lb 5.3 oz. 
Nature's Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 Virginia

Nature's Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 Virginia

$29.95
More Info
In the Shenandoah Valley and Peninsula Campaigns of 1862, Union and Confederate soldiers faced unfamiliar and harsh environmental conditions--strange terrain, tainted water, swarms of flies and mosquitoes, interminable rain and snow storms, and oppressive heat--which contributed to escalating disease and diminished morale. Using soldiers' letters, diaries, and memoirs, plus a wealth of additional personal accounts, medical sources, newspapers, and government documents, Kathryn Shively Meier reveals how these soldiers strove to maintain their physical and mental health by combating their deadliest enemy--nature. Meier explores how soldiers forged informal networks of health care based on prewar civilian experience and adopted a universal set of self-care habits, including boiling water, altering camp terrain, eradicating insects, supplementing their diets with fruits and vegetables, constructing protective shelters, and most controversially, straggling. In order to improve their health, soldiers periodically had to adjust their ideas of manliness, class values, and race to the circumstances at hand. While self-care often proved superior to relying upon the inchoate military medical infrastructure, commanders chastised soldiers for testing army discipline, ultimately redrawing the boundaries of informal health care. Publisher: University of North Carolina Press. Paperback, 224 Pages. Measures 9"x6"x0.5" . Weighs 12.1 oz.
On A Great Battlefield: The Making, Management and Memory of Gettysburg National Battlefield, 1933-2013

On A Great Battlefield: The Making, Management and Memory of Gettysburg National Battlefield, 1933-2013

$29.95
More Info
Of the more than seventy sites associated with the Civil War era that the National ParkService manages, none hold more national appeal and recognition than Gettysburg NationalMilitary Park. Welcoming more than one million visitors annually from across thenation and around the world, the National Park Service at Gettysburg holds the enormousresponsibility of preserving the war's "hallowed ground" and educating the public, notonly on the battle, but also about the Civil War as the nation's defining moment. Althoughhistorians and enthusiasts continually add to the shelves of Gettysburg scholarship, theyhave paid only minimal attention to the battlefield itself and the process of preserving,interpreting, and remembering the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. In On a Great Battlefield,Jennifer M. Murray provides a critical perspective to Gettysburg historiography byoffering an in-depth exploration of the national military park and how the Gettysburgbattlefield has evolved since the National Park Service acquired the site in August 1933. As Murray reveals, the history of the Gettysburg battlefield underscores the complexityof preserving and interpreting a historic landscape. After a short overview of earlyefforts to preserve the battlefield by the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Association(1864-1895) and the United States War Department (1895-1933), Murray chronicles theadministration of the National Park Service and the multitude of external factors--includingthe Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Civil War Centennial, andrecent sesquicentennial celebrations--that influenced operations and molded Americans'understanding of the battle and its history. Haphazard landscape practices, promotion oftourism, encouragement of recreational pursuits, ill-defined policies of preserving culturalresources, and the inevitable turnover of administrators guided by very differentpreservation values regularly influenced the direction of the park and the presentationof the Civil War's popular memory. By highlighting the complicated nexus between preservation,tourism, popular culture, interpretation, and memory, On a Great Battlefieldprovides a unique perspective on the Mecca of Civil War landscapes. Jennifer M. Murray, assistant professor of history at the University of Virginia's Collegeat Wise, is the author of The Civil War Begins. Her articles have appeared in Civil WarHistory, Civil War Times, and Civil War Times Illustrated. Publisher: University of Tennesse Press. Paperback, 312 Pages. Measures 8.75"x6"x0.6" . Weighs 15.8 oz.
On This Day in West Virginia Civil War History

On This Day in West Virginia Civil War History

$21.99
More Info
West Virginia is the only state formed by seceding from a Confederate state. And its connections to the Civil War run deep. One day at a time, award-winning historian Michael Graham presents intriguing, event-driven anecdotes and history related to the state. On July 11, 1861, a Union force attacked 1,300 Confederate troops camped at Rich Mountain in a renowned battle. Confederate guerrillas raided Hackers Creek on June 12, 1864. Find little-known facts about the Battles of Droop Mountain, Carnifex Ferry, Harpers Ferry, Shepherdstown and a whole host of others. Read a story one day or month at a time. Celebrate an entire year of Civil War history in the Mountain State. Publisher: The History Press. Paperback, 192 Pages. Measures 9"x6"x0.4" . Weighs 14.5 oz.
Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments and Equipment Vol 2

Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments and Equipment Vol 2

$9.95
More Info
Publisher: Pictorial Histories Publishing Company . Paperback, 96 Pages. Measures 11"x8.5"x0.25". Weighs 12.8 oz.
Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments and Equipment Vol 3

Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments and Equipment Vol 3

$9.95
More Info
Publisher: Pictorial Histories Publishing Company. Paperback, 128 Pages. Measures 11"x8.5"x0.25" . Weighs 1lb 1.8 oz
Reconciliation Quilt Puzzle

Puzzle Reconciliation Quilt

$17.95
More Info
Lucinda Ward Honstain (American, 1820 1904) pieced and sewed this quilt offorty blocks depicting scenes of domestic life and public events in the 1860s. The central three-panel appliqué represents her farm in Brooklyn, New York. Two other blocks celebrate what Honstain viewed as significant reconciliatory events in postbellum America: the freeing of former Confederate president Jefferson Davis and the granting of suffrage to freed slaves. The Reconciliation Quilt is now in the collection of the International Quilt Study Center & Museum at Quilt House in Lincoln, Nebraska, whose mission is to inspire an understanding of the cultural and artistic significance of quilts and quilt-making traditions from many cultures, countries, and times. It is the largest publicly held quilt collection in the world. Thoughtfully crafted with large pieces, Pomegranate's 300-piece jigsaw puzzles combine kid-friendly artwork, superb color reproduction, and sturdy construction to delight young puzzle solvers for years to come. Box measures 10.6" x 8.7" x 1.8". Weighs 1.55 lbs.
Rebel Hart

Rebel Hart

$12.95
More Info
A farm girl from the mountains of what would become West Virginia leaves home to join a group of rebel raiders who strike Federal Army encampments during the Civil War. Publisher: White Mane Kids. Paperback, 182 pages. Measures 5.5" x 8.5" x 0.4". Weighs 8.5 oz.
Rebel War Clerk's Diary Vol. 2

Rebel War Clerk's Diary Vol. 2

$50.00
More Info
Amidst the vast literature of the Civil War, one of the most significant and enlightening documents remains largely unknown. A day-by-day, uninterrupted, four-year chronicle by a mature, keenly observant clerk in the War Department of the Confederacy, the wartime diary of John Beauchamp Jones was first published in two volumes of small type in 1866. Over the years, the diary was republished three more times--but never with an index or an editorial apparatus to guide a reader through the extraordinary mass of information it contained. Published here with an authoritative editorial framework, including an extensive introduction and endnotes, this unique record of the Civil War takes its rightful place as one of the best basic reference tools in Civil War history, absolutely critical to study the Confederacy.

A Maryland journalist/novelist who went south at the outbreak of the war, Jones took a job as a senior clerk in the Confederate War Department, where he remained to the end, a constant observer of men and events in Richmond, the heart of the Confederacy and the principal target of Union military might. As a high-level clerk at the center of military planning, Jones had an extraordinary perspective on the Southern nation in action--and nothing escaped his attention. Confidential files, command-level conversations, official correspondence, revelations, rumors, statistics, weather reports, and personal opinions: all manner of material, found nowhere else in Civil War literature, made its meticulous way into the diary. Jones quotes scores of dispatches and reports by both military and civilian authorities, including letters from Robert E. Lee never printed elsewhere, providing an invaluable record of documents that would later find their way into print only in edited form. His notes on such ephemera as weather and prices create a backdrop for the military movements and political maneuverings he describes, all with the judicious eye of a seasoned writer and observer of southern life.

James I. Robertson, Jr., provides introductions to each volume, over 2,700 endnotes that identify, clarify, and expand on Jones's material, and a first ever index which makes Jones's unique insights and observations accessible to interested readers, who will find in the pages of A Rebel War Clerk's Diary one of the most complete and richly textured accounts of the Civil War ever to be composed at the very heart of the Confederacy.

Replica Civil War Firearms Set

Replica Civil War Firearms Set

$16.50
More Info
Collectible solid metal replicas of five civil war firearms. Measures 10.5"x9"x0.25" . Weighs 10.4 oz.