Civil War

Gettysburg The Last Invasion

Gettysburg The Last Invasion

$23.00
More Info
Winner of the Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History

An Economist Best Book of the Year

A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of the Year


The Battle of Gettysburg has been written about at length and thoroughly dissected in terms of strategic importance, but never before has a book taken readers so close to the experience of the individual soldier.

Two-time Lincoln Prize winner Allen C. Guelzo shows us the face, the sights and the sounds of nineteenth-century combat: the stone walls and gunpowder clouds of Pickett's Charge; the reason that the Army of Northern Virginia could be smelled before it could be seen; the march of thousands of men from the banks of the Rappahannock in Virginia to the Pennsylvania hills. What emerges is a previously untold story of army life in the Civil War: from the personal politics roiling the Union and Confederate officer ranks, to the peculiar character of artillery units. Through such scrutiny, one of history's epic battles is given extraordinarily vivid new life.

Gettysburg: A Battlefield Guide

Gettysburg: A Battlefield Guide

$21.95
More Info
Little Round Top, the Railroad Cut, Pickett's Charge--these are the turning points within the most important battle of the Civil War. Even careful students of Gettysburg, however, can find themselves disoriented when visiting the site itself. Here, finally, is a convenient guide for serious student and casual visitor alike that makes plain the sweep of events and the geography of the battlefield. This invaluable guidebook was created by scholars who have walked the battlegrounds, consulted with local experts and park guides, and studied the testimony left behind by the participants. Gettysburg will help you find all the important locales and understand what the participants saw in 1863, even if you have no prior knowledge of the battle. Designed to enhance the experience of both first-time and returning visitors, this guide can be used alone or as a supplement to a tour. Clearly written and illustrated with maps and photographs, this is the book to have when you explore Gettysburg. Publisher: University of Nebraska Press. Paperback, 214 Pages. Measures 9"x5.9"x0.5" . Weighs 11.4 oz.
Grant

Grant

$24.00
More Info
The #1 New York Times bestseller and New York Times Book Review 10 Best Books of 2017 "Eminently readable but thick with import . . .Grant hits like a Mack truck of knowledge."--Ta-Nehisi Coates,The Atlantic Pulitzer Prize winner Ron Chernow returns with a sweeping and dramatic portrait of one of our most compelling generals and presidents, Ulysses S. Grant. Ulysses S. Grant's life has typically been misunderstood. All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and an inept businessman, or as the triumphant but brutal Union general of the Civil War. But these stereotypes don't come close to capturing him, as Chernow shows in his masterful biography, the first to provide a complete understanding of the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency. Before the Civil War, Grant was flailing. His business ventures had ended dismally, and despite distinguished service in the Mexican War he ended up resigning from the army in disgrace amid recurring accusations of drunkenness. But in war, Grant began to realize his remarkable potential, soaring through the ranks of the Union army, prevailing at the battle of Shiloh and in the Vicksburg campaign, and ultimately defeating the legendary Confederate general Robert E. Lee. Along the way, Grant endeared himself to President Lincoln and became his most trusted general and the strategic genius of the war effort. Grant's military fame translated into a two-term presidency, but one plagued by corruption scandals involving his closest staff members. More important, he sought freedom and justice for black Americans, working to crush the Ku Klux Klan and earning the admiration of Frederick Douglass, who called him "the vigilant, firm, impartial, and wise protector of my race." After his presidency, he was again brought low by a dashing young swindler on Wall Street, only to resuscitate his image by working with Mark Twain to publish his memoirs, which are recognized as a masterpiece of the genre. With lucidity, breadth, and meticulousness, Chernow finds the threads that bind these disparate stories together, shedding new light on the man whom Walt Whitman described as "nothing heroic... and yet the greatest hero." Chernow's probing portrait of Grant's lifelong struggle with alcoholism transforms our understanding of the man at the deepest level. This is America's greatest biographer, bringing movingly to life one of our finest but most underappreciated presidents. The definitive biography,Grantis a grand synthesis of painstaking research and literary brilliance that makes sense of all sides of Grant's life, explaining how this simple Midwesterner could at once be so ordinary and so extraordinary. Named one of the best books of the year by Goodreads -Amazon- The New York Times- Newsday-Book Page-Barnes and Noble- Wall Street Journal Publisher: Penguin Books. Paperback, 1076 Pages. Measures 9.25"x6"x2.25" . Weighs 2 lbs 11 oz. 
Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology: The Challenge of Change

Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology: The Challenge of Change

$25.95
More Info
Focusing on the day-to-day operations of the U.S. armory at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, from 1798 to 1861, this book shows what the "new technology" of mechanized production meant in terms of organization, management, and worker morale. A local study of much more than local significance, it highlights the major problems of technical innovation and social adaptation in antebellum America. Merritt Roe Smith describes how positions of authority at the armory were tied to a larger network of political and economic influence in the community; how these relationships, in turn, affected managerial behavior; and how local social conditions reinforced the reactions of decision makers. He also demonstrates how craft traditions and variant attitudes toward work vis-à-vis New England created an atmosphere in which the machine was held suspect and inventive activity was hampered. Of central importance is the author's analysis of the drastic differences between Harpers Ferry and its counterpart, the national armory at Springfield, Massachusetts, which played a pivotal role in the emergence of the new technology. The flow of technical information between the two armories, he shows, moved in one direction only― north to south. "In the end," Smith concludes, "the stamina of local culture is paramount in explaining why the Harpers Ferry armory never really flourished as a center of technological innovation." Pointing up the complexities of industrial change, this account of the Harpers Ferry experience challenges the commonly held view that Americans have always been eagerly receptive to new technological advances. Publisher: Cornell University Press. Paperback, 364 pages. Measures 9" x 5.75" x 0.8". Weighs 1 lb 2.1 oz.
Hayfoot, Strawfoot The Bucktail Recruits

Hayfoot, Strawfoot: The Bucktail Recruits

$7.95
More Info
Two innocent boys from a backwater hamlet march off to the turmoil of the Civil War and bond to face the rigors of armor life and the hope for glory. Publisher: White Mane Publishing Company. Paperback, 157 pages. Measures 5.5" x 8.5" 0.5". Weighs 8.3 oz.
Hiker's Guide to Civil War Trails in the Mid-Atlantic Region

Hiker's Guide to Civil War Trails in the Mid-Atlantic Region

$18.00
More Info
Hiker's Guide to Civil War Trails in the Mid-Atlantic Region includes 27 day-hikes around battlefields, along lines of march, and through defensive works. Each hike is accompanied by a simple but clear topo map and trail description as well as historical information about the events that happened along the path the hike follows and the significance of those events. Measures 7"x4.25"x0.3" . Weighs 6.2 oz.
Horse Soldiers Cavalry in the Civil War

Horse Soldiers Cavalry in the Civil War

$3.99
More Info
This highly praised series of books has been in print since the 1950s (launched originally by Franklin Watts himself). Today's First Books provide engaging, in-depth introductions to subjects in all areas of the middle-grade curriculum, including science, social studies, and the arts. Illustrated with color and historical photography and art, each First Book is chaptered, includes an index, a for-further-reading list and, where appropriate, a glossary and original maps. Publisher: Franklin Watts. Hardcover, 63 pages. Measures 7.25" x 8.75" x 0.4". Weighs 11.2 oz.
Hospital Life in the Army of the Potomac

Hospital Life in the Army of the Potomac

$14.95
More Info
From the preface: "The manuscript was written to preserve, for the writer's own satisfaction, a record of a valuable personal experience. As it grew under his hand, old memories were quickened, old comnpanionships seemed to be renewed, former scenes were revived, and the splendid examples of heroism which were daily and hourly witnessed kindled an impulse which has resulted in this work." Publisher: Applewood Books. Paperback, 199 pages. Measures 6" x 9" x 0.5". Weighs 10.7 oz. 
I Dread the Thought of the Place: The Battle of Antietam and the End of the Maryland Campaign

I Dread the Thought of the Place: The Battle of Antietam and the End of the Maryland Campaign

$54.95
More Info
The definitive account of the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest day of the Civil War. The memory of the Battle of Antietam was so haunting that when, nine months later, Major Rufus Dawes learned another Antietam battle might be on the horizon, he wrote, "I hope not, I dread the thought of the place." In this definitive account, historian D. Scott Hartwig chronicles the single bloodiest day in American history, which resulted in 23,000 casualties. The Battle of Antietam marked a vital turning point in the war: afterward, the conflict could no longer be understood as a limited war to preserve the Union, but was now clearly a conflict over slavery. Though the battle was tactically inconclusive, Robert E. Lee withdrew first from the battlefield, thus handing President Lincoln the political ammunition necessary to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. This is the full story of Antietam, ranging from the opening shots of the battle to the powerful reverberations--military, political, and social--it sent through the armies and the nation. Based on decades of research, this in-depth narrative sheds particular light on the visceral experience of battle, an often misunderstood aspect of the American Civil War, and the emotional aftermath for those who survived. Hartwig provides an hour-by-hour tactical history of the battle, beginning before dawn on September 17 and concluding with the immediate aftermath, including General McClellan's fateful decision not to pursue Lee's retreating forces back across the Potomac to Virginia. With 21 unique maps illustrating the state of the battle at intervals ranging from 20 to 120 minutes, this long-awaited companion to Hartwig's To Antietam Creek will be essential reading for anyone interested in the Civil War. Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press. Hardcover, 960 Pages. Measures 10.5" x 7.5" x 2.25" . Weighs 4 lbs 2 oz.
I was a Drummer Boy in the American Civil War

I was a Drummer Boy in the American Civil War

$12.95
More Info
This is the story of the nephew of my great uncle who marched with the 105th Illinois Infantry with General Sherman in his capture of Atlanta and his March to the Sea. Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform. Paperback, 52 pages. Measures 8.5" x 11"x0.2". Weighs 6.1 oz.