Civil War

Dr. Mary Walker's Civil War: One Woman's Journey to the Medal of Honor and the Fight for Women's Rights

Dr. Mary Walker's Civil War: One Woman's Journey to the Medal of Honor and the Fight for Women's Rights

$29.95
More Info
"I will always be somebody." This assertion, a startling one from a nineteenth-century woman, drove the life of Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, the only American woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor. President Andrew Johnson issued the award in 1865 in recognition of the incomparable medical service Walker rendered during the Civil War. Yet few people today know anything about the woman so well-known--even notorious--in her own lifetime. Theresa Kaminski shares a different way of looking at the Civil War, through the eyes of a woman confident she could make a contribution equal to that of any man. She takes readers into the political cauldron of the nation's capital in wartime, where Walker was a familiar if notorious figure. Mary Walker's relentless pursuit of gender and racial equality is key to understanding her commitment to a Union victory in the Civil War. Her role in the women's suffrage movement became controversial and the US Army stripped Walker of her medal, only to have the medal reinstated posthumously in 1977. Publisher: Lyons Press. Hardcover, 312 pages. Measures 6.2" x 9.25" x 1". Weighs 1 lb 8.4 oz.
Embattled Freedom: Journey through the Civil War's Refugee Camps

Embattled Freedom: Journey through the Civil War's Refugee Camps

$32.50
More Info
The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of thousands more followed in a mass exodus from slavery that would destroy the system once and for all. Drawing on an extraordinary survey of slave refugee camps throughout the country, Embattled Freedom reveals as never before the everyday experiences of these refugees from slavery as they made their way through the vast landscape of army-supervised camps that emerged during the war. Amy Murrell Taylor vividly reconstructs the human world of wartime emancipation, taking readers inside military-issued tents and makeshift towns, through commissary warehouses and active combat, and into the realities of individuals and families struggling to survive physically as well as spiritually. Narrating their journeys in and out of the confines of the camps, Taylor shows in often gripping detail how the most basic necessities of life were elemental to a former slave's quest for freedom and full citizenship. The stories of individuals--storekeepers, a laundress, and a minister among them--anchor this ambitious and wide-ranging history and demonstrate with new clarity how contingent the slaves' pursuit of freedom was on the rhythms and culture of military life. Taylor brings new insight into the enormous risks taken by formerly enslaved people to find freedom in the midst of the nation's most destructive war. Publisher: University of North Carolina Press. Paperback, 349 pages. Measures 6" x 9.25" x 0.75". Weighs 1 lb 3.2 oz. 
Faces of Civil War Nurses

Faces of Civil War Nurses

$32.95
More Info
A collection of rare archival images and biographical sketches of the dauntless women who served as nurses and caregivers during the Civil War. During the American Civil War, women on both sides of the conflict, radiating patriotic fervor equal to their male counterparts, contributed to the war effort in countless ways: forming charitable societies, becoming nurses, or even marching off to war as vivandières, unofficial attachés to the regiments. In Faces of Civil War Nurses, Ronald S. Coddington turns his attention to the experiences of 77 women of all ages and walks of life who provided care during the war as nurses, aid workers, and vivandières. Their personal narratives are as unique as fingerprints: each provides a distinct entry point into the larger social history of the brutal and bloody conflict. Coddington tells these determined women's stories through letters, diaries, pension files, and newspaper and government reports. Using identified tintypes and cartes de visite of women on both sides of the war, many of them never before published, Coddington uncovers the personal histories of each intrepid individual. Following their postwar stories, he also explains how the bonds they formed continued long after the cessation of hostilities. The fifth volume in Coddington's series on Civil War soldiers, this captivating microhistory will appeal to anyone with an interest in the Civil War, women's studies, social history, nursing, or photography. Praise for Ronald Coddington's Faces Series "An engaging look at a neglected part of the history of the American Civil War."--Booklist "Coddington has hit upon a unique and fascinating niche in the seemingly endless march of Civil War books."--C&RL News "A lavishly produced visual record of southern Civil War soldiers . . . will appeal to serious photography enthusiasts and collectors, as well as those readers captivated by the personal stories of Civil War soldiers."--Civil War Books and Authors "Coddington's prose is as unpretentious as the faces he shares, yet authoritative. It resurrects details that broaden our understanding of those sad times and sheds valuable light on the shape of modern culture."--Atlanta Constitution "Even at a distance of over a hundred years, the faces staring out of these pages create an undeniable emotional connection with the reader. This book is highly recommended."--H-CivWar, H-Net Reviews "A fascinating window into the war's impact on the individual soldier . . . well researched and engagingly written. Any teacher of the Civil War would do well to consult this volume and incorporate some of the captivating tales into lectures and readings."--Journal of Military History Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press. Hardback, 424 Pages. Measures 8.75"x5.75"x1" . Weighs 1 lb 12.1 oz.
Faces of Union Soldiers at South Mountain and Harpers Ferry

Faces of Union Soldiers at South Mountain and Harpers Ferry

$21.99
More Info
The first Confederate invasion of the North in the fall of 1862 led to a series of engagements known as the Maryland Campaign. Though best remembered for its climax, there was desperate fighting at both South Mountain and Harpers Ferry prior to the bloodletting at Antietam Creek. These battles in particular were desperate affairs of bloody attacks and determined defense. In this work are the images of thirty Union soldiers, published here for the first time, that help give a face and a history to those men who struggled up the slopes of South Mountain or sheltered from Confederate cannons at Harpers Ferry. Join Matthew Borders and Joseph Stahl as they introduce you to these men, their battles and their stories. Publisher: History Press. Paperback, 190 Pages. Measures 9"x6"x0.25" . Weighs 14.5 oz.
Field Guide to Gettysburg, 2nd edition

Field Guide to Gettysburg, 2nd edition

$24.00
More Info
This second, updated edition of the acclaimed A Field Guide to Gettysburg will lead visitors to every important site across the battlefield and also give them ways to envision the action and empathize with the soldiers involved and the local people into whose lives and lands the battle intruded. Both Carol Reardon and Tom Vossler are themselves experienced guides who understand what visitors to Gettysburg are interested in, but they also bring the unique perspectives of a scholar and a former army officer. Divided into three day-long tours, this newly improved and expanded edition offers important historical background and context for the reader while providing answers to six key questions: What happened here? Who fought here? Who commanded here? Who fell here? Who lived here? And what did the participants have to say about it later?

With new stops, maps, and illustrations, the second edition of A Field Guide to Gettysburg remains the most comprehensive guide to the events and history of this pivotal battle of the Civil War.



Flags of the Union: An Illustrated History

Flags of the Union: An Illustrated History

$22.95
More Info
The definitive companion volume now in color! This classic guide by Devereaux D. Cannon, Jr. has been updated with 20 additional flags and given a fresh wash of color by noted Civil War artist and historian Alan H. Archambault. Exploring the history and development of flags in the United States leading up to and during the Civil War, his research picks up where Cannon left off. The Wall Street Journal called Cannon's companion volume, The Flags of the Confederacy: An Illustrated History, "the last word on the flags of the lost cause." This volume continues that tradition. Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company Inc. Paperback, 112 Pages. Measures 10.8"x8.5"x0.2" .  Weighs 9.3 oz.
Frederick in the Civil War: Battle & Honor in the Spired City

Frederick in the Civil War: Battle & Honor in the Spired City

$21.99
More Info
Just south of the Mason-Dixon Line, Frederick, Maryland, was poised at the crossroads of the Civil War. Here, Confederate troops passed west to the Battles of Antietam and South Monocacy, while Union troops marched north to Gettysburg and south to raid the resources of the Shenandoah Valley. Both heroes and villains were made in the spired city, such as Dame Barbara Fritchie, who is said to defied General Jackson; General Jubal Early, who threatened to put the town to the torch; and the local doctors and nurses who cared for thousands of wounded soldiers. Join local historian John Schildt as he recounts the fascinating history of Frederick in the Civil War. Publisher: The History Press. Paperback, 160 Pages. Measures 8.9"x5.9"x0.3" . Weighs 11.9 oz.
National Park War A Card Game Featuring United States Battlefield, Military Parks and more

Game National Park War: A Card Game Featuring United States Battlefield, Military Parks and more

$12.00
More Info
Enjoy the classic card game of war with this exciting game featuring United States historical battlefields, monuments and more. Over 90 locations are illustrated on 52 unique playing cards. Historical information included on each card. Packaged in a heavy duty two-piece box. Interpretive map included on the back of the box. Measures 6.25"x5"x1.5". Weighs 7.6 oz.
Gardners Photographic Sketch Book of the Civil War

Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the Civil War

$19.95
More Info
Second only to Matthew Brady as the foremost early American photographer was Alexander Gardner, the one-time manager of Brady's Washington salon and Brady's chief photographer in the field during the early days of the Civil War. Indeed, Gardner - who later photographed the War independently - often managed the famous horse-drawn photographic laboratory and took many of the pictures that used to be attributed to Brady. He accompanied the Union troops on their marches, their camps and bivouacs, their battles, and on their many hasty retreats and routs during the early days of the War. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 224 pages. Measures 10.2" x 8.25" x 0.5". Weighs 1 lb 8.1 oz. 
Genteel Rebel: The Life of Mary Greenhow Lee

Genteel Rebel: The Life of Mary Greenhow Lee

$25.95
More Info
This elegantly written biography depicts the combined effect of social structure, character, and national crisis on a woman's life. Mary Greenhow Lee (1819-1907) was raised in a privileged Virginia household. As a young woman, she flirted with President Van Buren's son, drank tea with Dolley Madison, and frolicked in bedsheets through the streets of Washington with her sister-in-law, future Confederate spy Rose O'Neal Greenhow. Later in life, Lee debated with senators, fed foreign emissaries and correspondents, scolded generals, and nursed soldiers. As a Confederate sympathizer in the hotly contested small border town of Winchester, Virginia, she ran an underground postal service, hid contraband under her nieces' dresses, abetted the Rebel cause, and was finally banished. Lee's personal history is an intriguing story. It is also an account of the complex social relations that characterized nineteenth-century life. She was an elite southern woman who knew the rules but who also flouted and other times flaunted the prevailing gender arrangements. Her views on status suggest that the immeasurable markers of prestige were much more important than wealth in her social stratum. She had strong ideas about who was (or was not) her "equal," yet she married a man of quite modest means. Lee's biography also enlarges our view of Confederate patriotism, revealing a war within a war and divisions arising as much from politics and geography as from issues of slavery and class. Mary Greenhow Lee was a woman of her time and place -- one whose youthful rebellion against her society's standards yielded to her desire to preserve that society's way of life. Genteel Rebel illustrates the value of biography as history as it narrates the eventful life of a surprisingly powerful southern lady. Publisher: Lousiana State University. Paperback, 259 Pages. Measures 8.75"x5.75"x0.5" . Weighs 13.1 oz.