Women's Biography

Mary Chestnut's Diary

Mary Chestnut's Diary

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An unrivalled account of the American Civil War from the Confederate perspective.

One of the most compelling personal narratives of the Civil War, Mary Chesnut's Diary was written between 1861 and 1865. As the daughter of a wealthy plantation owner and the wife of an aide to the Confederate President, Jefferson Davis, Chesnut was well acquainted with the Confederacy's prominent players and-from the very first shots in Charleston, South Carolina-diligently recorded her impressions of the conflict's most significant moments. One of the most frequently cited memoirs of the war, Mary Chesnut's Diary captures the urgency and nuance of the period in an epic rich with commentary on race, status, and power within a nation divided.

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Nurse, Soldier, Spy The Story of Sara Edmonds A Civil War Hero

Nurse, Soldier, Spy The Story of Sara Edmonds A Civil War Hero

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A thrilling picture book biography of Civil War soldier Sarah Emma Edmonds, from award-winning creators Marissa Moss and John Hendrix

When Frank Thompson sees a recruitment poster for the new Union army, he's ready and willing to enlist. Except Frank isn't his real name. In fact, Frank is really Sarah Emma Edmonds, in disguise.

Only nineteen years old, Sarah has already been dressing as a man for three years and living on the run in order to escape an arranged marriage. She's tasted freedom, and as far as she's concerned, there's no going back.

Eager to fight for the North during the Civil War, Sarah joins a Michigan infantry regiment. She excels as a soldier and even takes on the grueling task of nursing the wounded. Because of her heroism, she is asked to become a spy, cross enemy lines, and infiltrate a Confederate camp. For her first mission, Sarah must once again disguise herself and rely on the kindness of enslaved people to help her do her job.

This incredible true story of a brave young woman who makes an unlikely choice to fight for her country is one that should not be lost to history.

They Fought Like Demons Women Soldiers in the Civil War

They Fought Like Demons Women Soldiers in the Civil War

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"Albert Cashier" served three years in the Union Army and passed successfully as a man until 1911 when the aging veteran was revealed to be a woman named Jennie Hodgers. Frances Clayton kept fighting even after her husband was gunned down in front of her at the Battle of Murfreesboro. And more than one soldier astonished "his" comrades-in-arms by giving birth in camp.

This lively and authoritative book opens a hitherto neglected chapter of Civil War history, telling the stories of hundreds of women who adopted male disguise and fought as soldiers. It explores their reasons for enlisting; their experiences in combat, and the way they were seen by their fellow soldiers and the American public. Impeccably researched and narrated with verve and wit, They Fought Like Demons is a major addition to our understanding of the Civil War era.

Wild Rose The True Story of a Civil War Spy

Wild Rose The True Story of a Civil War Spy

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For sheer bravado and style, no woman in the North or South rivaled the Civil War heroine Rose O'Neale Greenhow. Fearless spy for the Confederacy, glittering Washington hostess, legendary beauty and lover, Rose Greenhow risked everything for the cause she valued more than life itself. In this superb portrait, biographer Ann Blackman tells the surprising true story of a unique woman in history.

"I am a Southern woman, born with revolutionary blood in my veins," Rose once declared-and that fiery spirit would plunge her into the center of power and the thick of adventure. Born into a slave-holding family, Rose moved to Washington, D.C., as a young woman and soon established herself as one of the capital's most charming and influential socialites, an intimate of John C. Calhoun, James Buchanan, and Dolley Madison.

She married well, bore eight children and buried five, and, at the height of the Gold Rush, accompanied her husband Robert Greenhow to San Francisco. Widowed after Robert died in a tragic accident, Rose became notorious in Washington for her daring-and numerous-love affairs.

But with the outbreak of the Civil War, everything changed. Overnight, Rose Greenhow, fashionable hostess, become Rose Greenhow, intrepid spy. As Blackman reveals, deadly accurate intelligence that Rose supplied to General Pierre G. T. Beauregard written in a fascinating code (the code duplicated in the background on the jacket of this book). Her message to Beauregard turned the tide in the first Battle of Bull Run, and was a brilliant piece of spycraft that eventually led to her arrest by Allan Pinkerton and imprisonment with her young daughter.

Indomitable, Rose regained her freedom and, as the war reached a crisis, journeyed to Europe to plead the Confederate cause at the royal courts of England and France.
Drawing on newly discovered diaries and a rich trove of contemporary accounts, Blackman has fashioned a thrilling, intimate narrative that reads like a novel. Wild Rose is an unforgettable rendering of an astonishing woman, a book that will stand with the finest Civil War biographies.

Women of the Confederacy

Women of the Confederacy

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Despite the limited opportunities for them at the time, women made a significant impact during the American Civil War. Some chose to serve as nurses, helping wounded soldiers. Others worked secretly as spies or disguised themselves as men and enlisted in the Confederate Army. Enslaved women eagerly awaited their freedom, but didn't know what the future held. Others struggled to keep their farms and plantations going. These women not only survived, but also faced the unknown with courage and strength.
Women of the Union

Women of the Union

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During the American Civil War, women had limited opportunities and little political influence. But when thousands of women from Northern states offered their time and skills to support the war effort, they not only impacted the war but also transformed the role of women. Some daring women ventured to the battlefields to serve as nurses, doctors, cooks, and spies. Some even disguised themselves as men and secretly joined the Army. These women bravely faced the challenges of war and helped reshape the nation.