Medical, Doctors, Nurses

My Heart Toward Home Letters of a Family During the Civil War

My Heart Toward Home Letters of a Family During the Civil War

$19.95
More Info
Through the story of this one family, the reader glimpses the sweep of the northern Civil War experience. The Woolseys of New York City -- a widowed mother, seven daughters, and one son devoted their lives to the preservation of their beloved Union. Georgeanna, Jane, Eliza, Carry, and Hatty served in military hospitals. Abby organized sewing and supply work for the Women's Central Association of Relief. Mary wrote patriotic poems. Moremamma Woolsey rushed to Gettysburg to nurse the wounded. This book tells us of women carving out a role in the wider war effort and the beginnings of the nursing profession. It is a journey into the social world of wealthy New York society. It is one of the great family stories of the Civil War.
Women at the Front Hospital Workers in Civil War America

Women at the Front Hospital Workers in Civil War America

$27.95
More Info
As many as 20,000 women worked in Union and Confederate hospitals during America's bloodiest war. Black and white, and from various social classes, these women served as nurses, administrators, matrons, seamstresses, cooks, laundresses, and custodial workers. Jane E. Schultz provides the first full history of these female relief workers, showing how the domestic and military arenas merged in Civil War America, blurring the line between homefront and battlefront.

Schultz uses government records, private manuscripts, and published sources by and about women hospital workers, some of whom are familiar--such as Dorothea Dix, Clara Barton, Louisa May Alcott, and Sojourner Truth--but most of whom are not well-known. Examining the lives and legacies of these women, Schultz considers who they were, how they became involved in wartime hospital work, how they adjusted to it, and how they challenged it. She demonstrates that class, race, and gender roles linked female workers with soldiers, both black and white, but became sites of conflict between the women and doctors and even among themselves.

Schultz also explores the women's postwar lives--their professional and domestic choices, their pursuit of pensions, and their memorials to the war in published narratives. Surprisingly few parlayed their war experience into postwar medical work, and their extremely varied postwar experiences, Schultz argues, defy any simple narrative of pre-professionalism, triumphalism, or conciliation.

As many as 20,000 women worked in Union and Confederate hospitals during America's bloodiest war. Black and white, and from various social classes, these women served as nurses, administrators, matrons, seamstresses, cooks, laundresses, and custodial workers. Jane Schultz provides the first full history of these female relief workers, showing how the domestic and military arenas merged in Civil War America, blurring the line between homefront and battlefront. Examining the lives and legacies of Dorothea Dix, Clara Barton, Susie King Taylor, and others, Schultz demonstrates that class, race, and gender roles linked female workers with soldiers, both black and white. These same factors also stoked conflict between the hospital women and doctors and even among the women themselves.







Years of Change and Suffering Modern Perspectives on Civil War Medicine

Years of Change and Suffering Modern Perspectives on Civil War Medicine

$19.95
More Info
Introducing new primary source material from experts in the field, this thoughtful and detailed discussion covers the battlefields, hospitals, and laboratories of the Civil War period while also considering the effects of the war on the mental and physical health of veterans many years later. Turning conventional wisdom on its head, this collection discusses the advances made in the understanding and treatment of diseases and wounds to the nervous system by the end of the war along with the new surgical techniques that were used to treat battlefield injuries once thought to be fatal. Topics also discussed include how the Confederate army marshaled a wide array of resources, including plants from its rich fields and forests, to furnish its physicians with medicines needed to treat patients and how each year of the war saw improved survival and better recovery as surgeons learned how to treat destructive injuries of the kidneys, bladder, urethra, and genitals--injuries previously thought to be fatal. Perfect for Civil War enthusiasts, professional historians, medical professionals, or medical journals, this serious look at Civil War medicine is designed for a popular audience but filled with enough extensive research to be used in a classroom.