Antietam

Too Afraid to Cry Maryland Civilians in the Antietam Campaign

Too Afraid to Cry Maryland Civilians in the Antietam Campaign

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Now Available in Paperback - First study of the Antietam campaign from civilians' perspectives - Many never-before-published accounts of the Battle of Antietam The battle at Antietam Creek, the bloodiest day of the American Civil War, left more than 23,000 men dead, wounded, or missing. Facing the aftermath were the men, women, and children living in the village of Sharpsburg and on surrounding farms. In Too Afraid to Cry, Kathleen Ernst recounts the dramatic experiences of these Maryland citizens--stories that have never been told--and also examines the complex political web holding together Unionists and Secessionists, many of whom lived under the same roofs in this divided countryside. Publisher: Stackpole Books. Paperback, 300 Pages. Measures 9"x6"x0.5" . Weighs 14.9 oz.
When Hell Came to Sharpsburg: The Battle of Antietam and Its Impact on the Civilians Who Called It Home

When Hell Came to Sharpsburg: The Battle of Antietam and Its Impact on the Civilians Who Called It Home

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Discover a forgotten chapter of American history with Steven Cowie's riveting account of the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, fought in and around Sharpsburg, Maryland, on September 17, 1862, was the bloodiest day in American history. Despite the large number of books and articles on the subject, the battle's horrendous toll on area civilians is rarely discussed. When Hell Came to Sharpsburg: The Battle of Antietam and Its Impact on the Civilians Who Called It Home by Steven Cowie rectifies this oversight. By the time the battle ended about dusk that day, more than 23,000 men had been killed, wounded, or captured in just a dozen hours of combat--a grim statistic that tells only part of the story. The epicenter of that deadly day was the small community of Sharpsburg. Families lived, worked, and worshipped there. It was their home. And the horrific fighting turned their lives upside down. When Hell Came to Sharpsburg investigates how the battle and opposing armies wreaked emotional, physical, and financial havoc on the people of Sharpsburg. For proper context, the author explores the savage struggle and its gory aftermath and explains how soldiers stripped the community of resources and spread diseases. Cowie carefully and meticulously follows the fortunes of individual families like the Mummas, Roulettes, Millers, and many others--ordinary folk thrust into harrowing circumstances--and their struggle to recover from their unexpected and often devastating losses. Cowie's comprehensive study is grounded in years of careful research. He unearthed a trove of previously unused archival accounts and examined scores of primary sources such as letters, diaries, regimental histories, and official reports. Packed with explanatory footnotes, original maps, and photographs, Cowie's richly detailed book is a must-read for those seeking new information on the battle and the perspective of the citizens who suffered because of it. Antietam's impact on the local community was an American tragedy, and it is told here completely for the first time. Publisher: Savas Beatie. Hardcover, 514 Pages. Measures 9.25"x6"x1.25" . Weighs 1 lb 14.5 oz.
Antietam Revealed: The Battle of Antietam and the Maryland Campaign as You Have Never Seen it Before

Antietam Revealed: The Battle of Antietam and the Maryland Campaign as You Have Never Seen it Before

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Written by the Chief Historian at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Antietam Revealed is a chronological survey of the 1862 Maryland Campaign and battle of Antietam (September 17, 1862). The volume contains 1,865 entries, four maps, 32 photographs, a biliography and index. Publisher: C.W. Historicals. Paperback, 198 pages. Measures 6" x 8.75" x 0.5". Weighs 10.1 oz.