Civil War

Harpers Ferry Under Fire A Border Town in the American Civil War

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Harpers Ferry experienced the Civil War like no other place and was a case study of repeated invasions, military operations, martial law, and endless danger. Journey into the Civil War with stories from those who lived, worked, fought, and died in a border town. This narrative is complemented by full color and black-and-white illustrations, photographs, and maps. Paperback, 200 pages. Dennis E. Frye is the Chief Historian at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Writer, lecturer, guide, and preservationist, Dennis is a prominent Civil War historian. Dennis has numerous appearances on PBS, The History Channel, The Discovery Channel, and A&E as a guest historian, and he helped produce award-winning television features on the Battle of Antietam and abolitionist John Brown. Dennis served as an Associate Producer for the Civil War movie Gods and Generals, during which he recruited and coordinated nearly 3,000 re-enactors for the film. Dennis also is one of the nation's leading Civil War battlefield preservationists. He is co-founder and first president of the Save Historic Antietam Foundation, and he is co-founder and a former president of today's Civil War Preservation Trust, where he helped save battlefields in twelve states. Dennis is a tour guide in demand, leading tours for organizations such as the Smithsonian, National Geographic, numerous colleges and universities, and Civil War Round Tables.

Harpers Ferry experienced the Civil War like no other place and was a case study of repeated invasions, military operations, martial law, and endless danger. Journey into the Civil War with stories from those who lived, worked, fought, and died in a border town. This narrative is complemented by full color and black-and-white illustrations, photographs, and maps. Paperback, 200 pages.Author Dennis E. Frye is the Chief Historian at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. He is a writer, lecturer, guide, preservationist, and prominent Civil War historian. A well-know author, Dennis has written 77 articles and six books.

Blue & Gray Magazine History and Tour Guide of Stonewall Jackson's Battle of Harpers Ferry September 12-15, 1862

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At the bottom of the “hole” where the Shenandoah River flows into the Potomac River is the village of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia (which was Virginia in 1862). Towering over this confluence are Maryland Heights, Loudoun Heights, and Bolivar Heights. It all makes for wild, scenic beauty, but the town becomes virtually indefensible if enemy cannons are placed on the heights. In September 1862, Stonewall Jackson did exactly that.But Jackson was late. He was unable to meet Robert E. Lee’s stringent timetable for capturing Harpers Ferry, and the unprecedented loss of Lee’s Special Orders 191 – which detailed the Confederate invasion plan – compromised the operation and endangered the Confederate army. Often overshadowed by Antietam, the battle never would have occurred without Stonewall’s actions at Harpers Ferry.This guide includes several color and black-and-white photographs and maps of the battlefields.Paperback, 103 pages 

Harpers Ferry Anthology: Civil War-era Stories by Park Rangers and Volunteers

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Published by the Harpers Ferry Park Association in memory of David L. Larsen, Interpreter.The diaries, letters and memoirs of the civilians and soldiers who experienced the war in Harpers Ferry have provided park interpreters an invaluable tool for transporting park visitors to the past. Here are 24 stories written by 17 interpreters, volunteers, rangers and interns that recreate six harrowing years of a town under attack. Paperback, 118 pages.

Springfield Armory DVD

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The 174-year history of weapons manufacture is told in "Springfield Armory". Craftsmen in clothing of the period are shown in actual stages of production including shaping the gunstock on the Blanchard lathe.The production of weapons at the Springfield Armory was very similar to the activities at the Harpers Ferry Armory.Running time: 18 minutes. Bonus films on this DVD include John Brown's Raid: To Do Battle in the Land, Antietam Visit, and Back to Harpers Ferry.
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"So Much to Say": The Civil War Letters of Corporal Robert Bradbury, Battery D, First Pennsylvania Light Artillery

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When Robert Bradbury enlisted in the 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery in August 1862 he held strong convictions to do whatever he could to support the Union War effort. This series of twenty-nine letters chronicles not only Bradbury's wartime experience from the Virginia Peninsula to the Shenandoah Valley, but presents his thoughts on the war, politics, and the home front.
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"We Are In For It!" The First Battle of Kernstown

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The full story of the First clash in the series that comprised Stonewall Jackson's legendary Shenandoah Valley Campaign.

40th Virginia Infantry

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Abraham Lincoln Crossword Puzzles

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From a log cabin to the White House, from the Black Hawk War to the Civil War, learn more about these 16th president of the United States. Travel with Lincoln to Richmond and Gettysburg, fight with the troops at Antietam and Shiloh, and try to bridge the gap between the North and the South.
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American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - From the author of A. Lincoln, a major new biography of one of America's greatest generals--and most misunderstood presidents

Winner of the William Henry Seward Award for Excellence in Civil War Biography - Finalist for the Gilder-Lehrman Military History Book Prize

In his time, Ulysses S. Grant was routinely grouped with George Washington and Abraham Lincoln in the "Trinity of Great American Leaders." But the battlefield commander-turned-commander-in-chief fell out of favor in the twentieth century. In American Ulysses, Ronald C. White argues that we need to once more revise our estimates of him in the twenty-first.

Based on seven years of research with primary documents--some of them never examined by previous Grant scholars--this is destined to become the Grant biography of our time. White, a biographer exceptionally skilled at writing momentous history from the inside out, shows Grant to be a generous, curious, introspective man and leader--a willing delegator with a natural gift for managing the rampaging egos of his fellow officers. His wife, Julia Dent Grant, long marginalized in the historic record, emerges in her own right as a spirited and influential partner.

Grant was not only a brilliant general but also a passionate defender of equal rights in post-Civil War America. After winning election to the White House in 1868, he used the power of the federal government to battle the Ku Klux Klan. He was the first president to state that the government's policy toward American Indians was immoral, and the first ex-president to embark on a world tour, and he cemented his reputation for courage by racing against death to complete his Personal Memoirs. Published by Mark Twain, it is widely considered to be the greatest autobiography by an American leader, but its place in Grant's life story has never been fully explored--until now.

One of those rare books that successfully recast our impression of an iconic historical figure, American Ulysses gives us a finely honed, three-dimensional portrait of Grant the man--husband, father, leader, writer--that should set the standard by which all future biographies of him will be measured.

Praise for American Ulysses

"[Ronald C. White] portrays a deeply introspective man of ideals, a man of measured thought and careful action who found himself in the crosshairs of American history at its most crucial moment."--USA Today

"White delineates Grant's virtues better than any author before. . . . By the end, readers will see how fortunate the nation was that Grant went into the world--to save the Union, to lead it and, on his deathbed, to write one of the finest memoirs in all of American letters."--The New York Times Book Review

"Ronald White has restored Ulysses S. Grant to his proper place in history with a biography whose breadth and tone suit the man perfectly. Like Grant himself, this book will have staying power."--The Wall Street Journal

"Magisterial . . . Grant's esteem in the eyes of historians has increased significantly in the last generation. . . . [American Ulysses] is the newest heavyweight champion in this movement."--The Boston Globe

"Superb . . . illuminating, inspiring and deeply moving."--Chicago Tribune

"In this sympathetic, rigorously sourced biography, White . . . conveys the essence of Grant the man and Grant the warrior."--Newsday

Antietam Shadows: Mystery, Myth and Machination

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A rip-roaring exposé that postulates history is the original "fake news"!In Antietam Shadows, Dennis E. Frye warns us to beware of history. A professional historian himself for the last forty years, Dennis has evolved from a youthful worshipper of history into a respected skeptic who has devoted his career to challenging historians, especially within the Civil War genre.Antietam Shadows is guaranteed to stimulate debate amongst Civil War buffs, as Dennis is renowned for blowing up what you know and turning you upside down and inside out. But Antietam Shadows isn't about strategy and tactics and bullets and shells. Antietam Shadows is the story of human nature—people facing dangerous dilemmas, selecting choices, making hard decisions, and living (or dying) with the consequences. The consequences within Antietam Shadows will determine the future of the United States. Author: Dennis E. FryePublication Date: 2018-4-17Publisher: Antietam Rest PublishingPaperback, 282
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Arlington National Cemetery A Guided Tour

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Walk through America's most sacred ground and come to know the people and events that have shaped history Known for its more than 300,000 graves and for iconic monuments including the John F. Kennedy gravesite and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington National Cemetery is one of America's most important historical landmarks. This book brings you face-to-face as never before with the people and events that have shaped its history. It features: - An introduction that sets Arlington National Cemetery in historical context - A timeline that adds further texture to the history described - A historical tour of key graves, including concise biographies of those who rest there - Nearby places to stay, eat, and visit - Archival and color photos throughout - Two PopOut maps--an archival map, and another showing the cemetery today About the Timeline series These one-of-a-kind books bring you face to face with the people and events that have shaped American history and who have left their mark on some of the nation's most important historical landmarks and locations.
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B is for Battle Cry A Civil War Alphabet

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The history and drama of the Civil War are explored. Topics include historic battles, renowned leaders, inventions, and inspiring events and documents.
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Backroads from the Beltway Your Guide to the Mid-Atlantic's Most Scenic Backroad

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With a quarter of a century behind it, Norfolk Southern is one of the oldest Class 1 railroads operating in North America. This illustrated history tells how Norfolk Southern came to be what it is today, from the merger of two of American railroadings most legendary roads-- Southern Railway and Norfolk and Western--through its rise to the heights of the worlds leading transportation companies.

After a concise history of the roads that became Norfolk Southern, author Richard Borkowski explores the railroads corporate history and operating structure and details the specific operations that go into the lines customer-oriented approach, including its vast intermodal network. Along with each of Norfolk Southerns 11 operating divisions, this book offers a close look at NS motive power, a wealth of color photographs, and a specially commissioned system map.
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Battle of Cedar Creek Victory from the Jaws of Defeat

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Nestled between the Allegheny and Blue Ridge Mountains, Virginia's Shenandoah Valley enjoyed tremendous prosperity before the Civil War.


This valuable stretch of land--called the Breadbasket of the Confederacy due to its rich soil and ample harvests--became the source of many conflicts between the Confederate and Union armies. Of the thirteen major battles fought here, none was more influential than the Battle of Cedar Creek. On October 19, 1864, General Philip Sheridan's Union troops finally gained control of the valley, which eliminated the Shenandoah as a supply source for Confederate forces in Virginia, ended the valley's role as a diversionary theater of war and stopped its use as an avenue of invasion into the North.

Civil War historian, preservationist, and author Jonathan A. Noyalas explains the battle and how it aided Abraham Lincoln's reelection campaign and defined Sheridan's enduring legacy.

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Battle of Fisher's Hill Breaking the Shenandoah Valley's Gibraltar

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A fascinating documentation of the Battle of Fisher's Hill, explaining this pivotal Civil War battle and its implications for nearby civilians.


The Battle of Fisher's Hill created a greater opportunity to destroy harvests from the "Breadbasket of the Confederacy" than any other Union victory in the hotly contested Shenandoah Valley. Union major general Philip Sheridan's men forced Confederate lieutenant general Jubal A. Early's smaller force to retreat, leading to the burning of barns and mills across the region. In this first-ever book focused on this engagement, Civil War historian Jonathan A. Noyalas explains the battle, its effect on area civilians and its meaning to both sides, as well as the battlefield's important role in postwar reunion and reconciliation.

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Battle of Piedmont and Hunter's Campaign for Staunton The 1864 Shenandoah Campaign

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The Battle of Piedmont has long been considered a small battle with massive consequences. A must-have for Shenandoah Valley and Civil War enthusiasts.


In 1864, General Grant tasked General David Hunter with raiding the breadbasket of the Shenandoah Valley and destroying the Confederate factories and supply lines. General Lee dispatched General William E. "Grumble" Jones, and the forces collided up the fertile fields of eastern Augusta County. It was a bloody day--the Battle of Piedmont saw more men killed and wounded than in any of Stonewall Jackson's 1862 Valley encounters. Sweeping on to victory, Federal forces then occupied Staunton and laid waste to the railroad and Confederate workshops.

Join Civil War historian Scott C. Patchan, a leading authority on the 1864 Shenandoah Valley Campaign and sitting member of Shenandoah Valley Battlefield Foundation's Resource Protection Committee, as he chronicles the campaign and sheds light on its place in the war.

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Battle of South Mountain

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In September 1862, Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia north of the Potomac River for the time as part of his Northern invasion, seeking a quick end to the war. Lee divided his army in three, sending General James Longstreet north to Hagerstown and Stonewall Jackson south to Harper's Ferry. It was at three mountain passes, referred to as South Mountain, that Lee's army met the Federal forces commanded by General George B. McClellan on September 14. In a fierce day-long battle spread out across miles of rugged, mountainous terrain, McClellan defeated Lee but the Confederates did tie up the Federals long enough to allow Jackson's conquest of Harper's Ferry. Join historian John Hoptak as he narrates the critical Battle of South Mountain, long overshadowed by the Battle of Antietam.
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Bravest Girl in Sharpsburg

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The daring adventure of best friends Teresa Kretzer and Savilla Miller have earned the the title of "the bravest girls in Sharpsburg'--and the admiration of Teresa's shy younger sister, Bethie. But when the Civil War looms, the girls become political enemies. Each girl must confront challenges that test everything she believes in. Learn how the Civil War divided these friends and tested courage from the experiences of real teenage girls whose hometown along Antietam Creek lay at the center of conflict in September 1862. Historic photographs and author's notes that separate the fact and the fiction help make this book appeal to all young readers.
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Chancellorsville 1863 The Souls of the Brave

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It was a landmark engagement in the history of warfare. It served as the single greatest display of Robert E. Lee's tactical genius and Stonewall Jackson's troop leadership. But while it was the high point of Civil War battlefield success for the South, Chancellorsville ultimately turned out to be a devastating blow to the future of the Confederacy. In Chancellorsville 1863, the first book on this great clash in three decades, Ernest B. Furgurson demonstrates why soldiers in America and abroad have studied the campaign as a classic for more than 125 years. Basing his work on extensive new research, including unpublished diaries and letters, Furgurson presents Chancellorsville not as a single episode but as a series of distinct and bloody clashes. He shows how Lee countered Union general Joseph Hooker's brilliant opening stroke with one risky move after another - no other Civil War general in either army would calculate or improvise maneuvers so daring. Furgurson examines why Hooker folded in a glaring display of moral weakness; he tells in detail how Jackson was struck down by friendly fire at his moment of triumph; and he describes the decisions and indecision in Washington and Richmond and army headquarters, and the bravery and terror of individual soldiers in the field. Combining an authoritative military analysis with wrenching eyewitness narratives, Chancellorsville 1863 makes clear why Lee's brightest victory predetermined his defeat at Gettysburg.

Chancellorsville Battlefield Sites

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Civil War A Traveler's Guide National Geographic

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Perfect for tour planning and on-the-ground use, this guide will prove indispensable on any expedition to explore Civil War history in America. Packed with color photographs, more than 600 historic battlefield and additional Civil War related sites, walking tours, 50 detailed maps, and the collective expertise of Civil War historians and dozens of park service experts, this handy, practical guide offers comprehensive information on the more than 384 sites recognized by the National Park Service as official battlefield locations, including the main Battlefield Sites, from Manassas to Appomattox Court House. In addition, this guide steers travelers to scores of additional little-seen and off-the-beaten path sites near the main battlefields. This guide helps travelers experience the Civil War chronologically, by location, or by campaign, experiencing the battles and skirmishes as the soldiers themselves would have encountered them: Follow Lee's march to Gettysburg or drive the Secession Trail through South Carolina. Walking tours provide visitors with detailed instructions, short histories, and a map so they can get out of the car and explore on foot. A history of individual parks is included, as well as books for further reading about specific figures or battles. A list of all of the Civil War battles in chronological order and a timeline of major events of the war puts the entire war in historical perspective. A complete list of all of the major campaigns as well as short biographies of key leaders and influential figures sheds light on the strategic maneuvers of the war. This travel guide is the perfect companion for any Civil War history exploration.

Civil War Artillery DVD

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Civil War Artillery includes two film selections: Firing the Napoleon details how a trained artillery crew services the Napoleon, one of the principal cannons used by both sides during the Civil War. Petersburg Cannon Firing shows soldiers in period costume demonstrating how a mounted artillery unit moved, set up, and the firing of a cannon. Also, an additional Revolutionary War period weapons demonstration is shown.Running time: 16 minutes. Bonus films on this DVD include To Keep Our Liberty, George Washington's Headquarters, A Few Men Well Conducted, Guilford Letters, and Siege of Yorktown.

Civil War Cookin', Stories, 'n Such

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Civil War Legacy in the Shenandoah

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After four bloody years of Civil War battles in the Shenandoah Valley, the region's inhabitants needed to muster the strength to recover, rebuild and reconcile. Most residents had supported the Confederate cause, and in order to heal the deep wounds of war, they would need to resolve differences with Union veterans. Union veterans memorialized their service. Confederate veterans agreed to forgive but not forget. And each side was key to the rebuilding effort. The battlefields of the Shenandoah, where men sacrificed their lives, became places for veterans to find common ground and healing through remembrance. Civil War historian and professor Jonathan A. Noyalas examines the evolution of attitudes among former soldiers as the Shenandoah Valley sought to find its place in the aftermath of national tragedy.
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Civil War Library of Congress Book of Postcards

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Civil War Poetry and Prose

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Walt Whitman experienced the agonies of the Civil War firsthand, working, in his forties, as a dedicated volunteer throughout the conflict in Washington's overcrowded, understaffed military hospitals. This superb selection of his poems, letters, and prose from the war years, filled with the sights and sounds of war and its ugly aftermath, express a vast and powerful range of emotions.
Among the poems include here, first published in Drum-Taps (1865) and Sequel to Drum-Taps (1866), are a number of Whitman's most famous works: "O Captain! My Captain!" "The Wound-Dresser," "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," and "Come Up from the Fields, Father." The letters and prose selections, including Whitman's musings on the publication of his works, on the wounded men he tended, and his impressions of Lincoln traveling about the city of Washington, offer keen insights into an extraordinary era in American history.

Civil War Songs and Stories Untold CD

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Confederates in the Attic Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War

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Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America's greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance. In Virginia, Horwitz joins a band of "hardcore" reenactors who crash-diet to achieve the hollow-eyed look of starved Confederates; in Kentucky, he witnesses Klan rallies and calls for race war sparked by the killing of a white man who brandishes a rebel flag; at Andersonville, he finds that the prison's commander, executed as a war criminal, is now exalted as a martyr and hero; and in the book's climax, Horwitz takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of Robert Lee Hodge, an eccentric pilgrim who dubs their odyssey the "Civil Wargasm." Written with Horwitz's signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, Confederates in the Attic brings alive old battlefields and new ones - classrooms, courts, country bars - where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways.
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Copperheads: The Rise and Fall of Lincoln's Opponents in the North

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The Northern home-front during the Civil War was far from tranquil. Fierce political debates set communities on edge, spurred secret plots against the Union, and triggered widespread violence. At the heart of all this turmoil stood the anti-war Democrats, nicknamed "Copperheads."

Now, Jennifer L. Weber offers the first full-length portrait of this powerful faction to appear in almost half a century. Weber reveals how the Copperheads came perilously close to defeating Lincoln and ending the war in the South's favor. Indeed, by the summer of 1864, they had grown so strong that Lincoln himself thought his defeat was "exceedingly likely." Passionate defenders of civil liberties and states' rights--and often virulent racists--the Copperheads deplored Lincoln's suspension of habeas corpus, his liberal interpretation of the Constitution, and, most vehemently, his moves toward emancipation. Weber reveals how the battle over these issues grew so heated that Northerners feared their neighbors would destroy their livestock, burn their homes, even kill them. And she illuminates the role of Union soldiers, who, furious at Copperhead attacks on the war effort, moved firmly behind Lincoln. The soldiers' support for the embattled president kept him alive politically in his darkest times, and their victories on the battlefield secured his re-election.

Packed with sharp observation and fresh interpretations, Copperheads is a gripping account of the fierce dissent that Lincoln called "the fire in the rear."

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Decision at Tom's Brook: George Custer, Thomas Rosser, and the Joy of the Fight

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The Battle of Tom's Brook, recalled one Confederate soldier, was "the greatest disaster that ever befell our cavalry during the whole war." The fight took place during the last autumn of the Civil War, when the Union General Phil Sheridan vowed to turn the crop-rich Shenandoah Valley into "a desert." Farms and homes were burned, livestock slaughtered, and Southern families suffered.

The story of the Tom's Brook cavalry affair centers on two young men who had risen to
prominence as soldiers: George A. Custer and Thomas L. Rosser. They had been friends since their teenage days at West Point, but the war sent them down separate paths--Custer to the Union army and Rosser to the Confederacy. Each was a born warrior who took obvious joy in the exhilaration of battle. Each possessed almost all of the traits of the ideal cavalryman--courage, intelligence, physical strength, inner fire. Only their judgment was questionable.

Their separate paths converged in the Shenandoah Valley in the autumn of 1864, when Custer was ordered to destroy, and Rosser was ordered to stop him. For three days, Rosser's gray troopers pursued and attacked the Federals. On the fourth day, October 9, the tables turned in the open fields above Tom's Brook, where each ambitious friend sought his own advancement at the expense of the other. One capitalized upon every advantage fate threw before him, while the other, sure of his abilities in battle and eager to fight, tried to impose his will on unfavorable circumstances and tempted fate by inviting catastrophe. This long-overlooked cavalry action had a lasting effect on mounted
operations and influenced the balance of the campaign in the Valley.

Based upon extensive research in primary documents and gracefully written, award-winning author William J. Miller's Decision at Tom's Brook presents significant new material on Thomas Rosser and argues that his character was his destiny. Rosser's decisions that day changed his life and the lives of hundreds of other men. Miller's new study is Civil War history and high personal drama at its finest.

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Discovering the Civil War

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Focusing on specific records to build into individual stories, this facinating book features over four hundred letters, diaries, photographs, maps, petitions, receipts, patents, amendments, and proclamations from the unparalleled holdings of the National Archives. It takes a fresh look at the war through little-known tales, seldom-seen documents, and unusual perspectives.

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Edge of Mosby?s Sword The Life of Confederate Colonel William Henry Chapman

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The Edge of Mosby's Sword is the first scholarly volume to delve into the story of one of John Singleton Mosby's most trusted and respected officers, Colonel William Henry Chapman. Presenting both military and personal perspectives of Chapman's life, Gordon B. Bonan offers an in-depth understanding of a man transformed by the shattering of his nation. This painstakingly researched account exposes a soldier and patriot whose convictions compelled him to battle fiercely for Southern independence; whose quest for greatness soured when faced with the brutal realities of warfare; and who sought to heal his wounded nation when the guns of war were silenced.
Born into a wealthy slave-owning family, Chapman was a student of the fiery secessionist rhetoric of antebellum Virginia who eagerly sought glory and adventure on the battlefields of the Civil War. Bonan traces Chapman's evolution from an impassioned student at the University of Virginia to an experienced warrior and leader, providing new insight into the officer's numerous military accomplishments. Explored here are Chapman's previously overlooked endeavors as a student warrior, leader of the Dixie Artillery, and as second-in-command to Mosby, including his participation in the capture of Harpers Ferry, the battering of Union forces at Second Manassas, and his ferocious raids during the 1864 Shenandoah Valley campaign. Bonan reveals fresh perspectives on the intrepid maneuvers of Mosby's Rangers, the hardships of war, and Chapman's crucial role as the right hand of the " Gray Ghost." But while Mosby recognized him for his bravery and daring, the fame Chapman sought always eluded him. Instead, with his honors and successes came disillusionment and sorrow, as he watched comrades and civilians alike succumb to the terrible toll of the war.

The end of the struggle between North and South saw Chapman accept defeat with dignity, leading the Rangers to their official surrender and parole at Winchester. With the horrors of the war behind him, he quickly moved to embrace the rebuilding of his country, joining the Republican party and beginning a forty-two-year career at the IRS enforcing Federal law throughout the South. In the end, Chapman's life is a study in contradictions: nationalism and reconciliation; slavery and liberty; vengeance and chivalry.

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Emancipation Proclamation: Three Views

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The Emancipation Proclamation is the most important document of arguably the greatest president in U.S. history. Now, Edna Greene Medford, Frank J. Williams, and Harold Holzer -- eminent experts in their fields -- remember, analyze, and interpret the Emancipation Proclamation in three distinct respects: the influence of and impact upon African Americans; the legal, political, and military exigencies; and the role pictorial images played in establishing the document in public memory. The result is a carefully balanced yet provocative study that views the proclamation and its author from the perspective of fellow Republicans, antiwar Democrats, the press, the military, the enslaved, free blacks, and the antislavery white establishment, as well as the artists, publishers, sculptors, and their patrons who sought to enshrine Abraham Lincoln and his decree of freedom in iconography.Medford places African Americans, the people most affected by Lincoln's edict, at the center of the drama rather than at the periphery, as previous studies have done. She argues that blacks interpreted the proclamation much more broadly than Lincoln intended it, and during the postwar years and into the twentieth century they became disillusioned by the broken promise of equality and the realities of discrimination, violence, and economic dependence. Williams points out the obstacles Lincoln overcame in finding a way to confiscate property -- enslaved humans -- without violating the Constitution. He suggests that the president solidified his reputation as a legal and political genius by issuing the proclamation as Commander-in-Chief, thus taking the property under the pretext of military necessity. Holzer explores how it was only after Lincoln's assassination that the Emancipation Proclamation became an acceptable subject for pictorial celebration. Even then, it was the image of the martyr-president as the great emancipator that resonated in public memory, while any reference to those African Americans most affected by the proclamation was stripped away.This multilayered treatment reveals that the proclamation remains a singularly brave and bold act -- brilliantly calculated to maintain the viability of the Union during wartime, deeply dependent on the enlightened voices of Lincoln's contemporaries, and owing a major debt in history to the image-makers who quickly and indelibly preserved it.

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Fate of War: Fredericksburg 1862

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An Exploration of the Human Experience in One of the Civil War's Most Important and Devastating Battles

The Union assault on the critical Confederate stronghold of Fredericksburg, Virginia, along the Rappahannock River in December 1862 was one of the most significant and storied battles of the Civil War. It was fought in order to secure confidence in the North for Lincoln's administration after 18 months of Confederate victories, Union setbacks, and directionless Northern leadership. The result was a complete and stunning Confederate victory and one of the bloodiest losses for the Union Army. Federal General Ambrose E. Burnside and his Army of the Potomac planned to overrun Fredericksburg and move on to Richmond, the Confederate capital. The opposing general, Robert E. Lee, and his Army of Northern Virginia prepared Fredericksburg's defense. Thousands of Union troops were able to successfully cross the Rappahannock River despite withering small arms fire and proceeded to brutally sack the city, terrorizing its remaining civilian inhabitants while the Confederates fell back to a line of heights to the west. Burnside soon ordered his generals to attack with the intention of flanking the Confederate defenders. Unable to dislodge or go around the enemy, Burnside was forced to withdraw without a victory after suffering appalling casualties.

In The Fate of War: Fredericksburg, 1862, historian and professional psychologist Duane Schultz uses this key moment in Civil War history to address how soldiers and civilians react to the stress of war. Rather than a traditional military history--and there are a number of excellent accounts of troop movements and strategy at Fredericksburg--The Fate of War explores the human element in battle; the motivations, passions, and emotions of the people who fought on both sides. Using letters, diaries, and memoirs, including those of Clara Barton and Walt Whitman, Schultz reveals what individuals can force themselves to do in the name of duty, patriotism, and dedication to a cause, or the ultimate fear of letting down their friends. Schultz's account, grounded in careful research, is a record of the triumph and failure, courage and cowardice, compassion and cruelty of the people--the ordinary and high-ranking, soldier and civilian, men and women--who came together one terrible day.

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Field Guide to Gettysburg, 2nd edition

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This second, updated edition of the acclaimed A Field Guide to Gettysburg will lead visitors to every important site across the battlefield and also give them ways to envision the action and empathize with the soldiers involved and the local people into whose lives and lands the battle intruded. Both Carol Reardon and Tom Vossler are themselves experienced guides who understand what visitors to Gettysburg are interested in, but they also bring the unique perspectives of a scholar and a former army officer. Divided into three day-long tours, this newly improved and expanded edition offers important historical background and context for the reader while providing answers to six key questions: What happened here? Who fought here? Who commanded here? Who fell here? Who lived here? And what did the participants have to say about it later?

With new stops, maps, and illustrations, the second edition of A Field Guide to Gettysburg remains the most comprehensive guide to the events and history of this pivotal battle of the Civil War.



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Fort Sumter: Cornerstones of Freedom

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This series meets National Curriculum Standards for: Science: Earth and Space Science, History and Nature of Science, Physical Science, Science and Technology, Science in Personal and Social Perspectives. Social Studies: Civic Ideals & Practices Global Connections Individuals, Groups, & Institutions People, Places, & Environments Power, Authority, & Governance Production, Distribution, & Consumption, Science, Technology, & Society Time, Continuity, & Change.

Fredericksburg Artillery

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Fredericksburg Civil War Sites II December 1862- April 1865

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General A.P. Hill The Story of a Confederate Warrior

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A Confederate general who ranks with Lee, Jeb Stuart, and Stonewall Jackson but whose achievements have been unfairly neglected until now, finally receives his due in this invaluable biography by a noted historian of the Civil War. Drawing extensively on newly unearthed documents, this work provides a gripping battle-by-battle assessment of Hill's role in Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and other battles. 8 pages of photographs.
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George Crook: From the Redwoods to Appomattox

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Renowned for his prominent role in the Apache and Sioux wars, General George Crook (1828-90) was considered by William Tecumseh Sherman to be his greatest Indian-fighting general. Although Crook was feared by Indian opponents on the battlefield, in defeat the tribes found him a true friend and advocate who earned their trust and friendship when he spoke out in their defense against political corruption and greed.

Paul Magid's detailed and engaging narrative focuses on Crook's early years through the end of the Civil War. Magid begins with Crook's boyhood on the Ohio frontier and his education at West Point, then recounts his nine years' military service in California during the height of the Gold Rush. It was in the Far West that Crook acquired the experience and skills essential to his success as an Indian fighter.

This is primarily an account of Crook's dramatic and sometimes controversial role in the Civil War, in which he was involved on three fronts, in West Virginia, Tennessee, and Virginia. Crook saw action during the battle of Antietam and played important roles in two major offensives in the Shenandoah Valley and in the Chattanooga and Appomattox campaigns. His courage, leadership, and tactical skills won him the respect and admiration of his commanding officers, including Generals Grant and Sheridan. He soon rose to the rank of major general and received four brevet promotions for bravery and meritorious service. Along the way, he led both infantry and cavalry, pioneered innovations in guerrilla warfare, conducted raids deep into enemy territory, and endured a kidnapping by Confederate partisans.

George Crook offers insight into the influences that later would make this general both a nemesis of the Indian tribes and their ardent advocate, and it illuminates the personality of this most enigmatic and eccentric of army officers.

Gettysburg Battles That Changed the World

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Marathon, Hastings, Midway -- just a few of the major battles covered in this series, which introduces readers to the wartime engagements that changed the course of human history. Each book gives a historical account of a decisive battle -- its participants, the political climate leading to the engagement, and the deciding factors that ultimately led to a victory or defeat. The furthest northern advance by the Confederates was met with their defeat by Union forces, a defeat that was a harbinger of the South's eventual surrender. Explains the events leading up to the Battle of Gettysburg, the defining battle of the Civil War, and describes the battle and its aftermath.
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Gettysburg, Day Three

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Jeffry D. Wert re-creates the last day of the bloody Battle of Gettysburg in astonishing detail, taking readers from Meade's council of war to the seven-hour struggle for Culp's Hill -- the most sustained combat of the entire engagement. Drawing on hundreds of sources, including more than 400 manuscript collections, he offers brief excerpts from the letters and diaries of soldiers. He also introduces heroes on both sides of the conflict -- among them General George Greene, the oldest general on the battlefield, who led the Union troops at Culp's Hill.
A gripping narrative written in a fresh and lively style, Gettysburg, Day Three is an unforgettable rendering of an immortal day in our country's history.
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Ghosts of Vicksburg

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Ghosts of Vicksburg centers on two young people during this Civil War campaign.
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Glorious Army Robert E. Lee's Triumph 1862-1863

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An "eloquent and judicious"* analysis of Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia, from one of leading Civil War historians--now in paperback.

From the time Robert E. Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia on June 1, 1862, until the Battle of Gettysburg thirteen months later, the Confederate army compiled a record of military achievement almost unparalleled in our nation's history. How it happened--the relative contributions of Lee, his top command, opposing Union generals, and of course the rebel army itself--is the subject of Civil War historian Jeffry D. Wert's fascinating new history.

Wert shows how the audacity and aggression that fueled Lee's victories ultimately proved disastrous at Gettysburg. But, as Wert explains, Lee had little choice: outnumbered by an opponent with superior resources, he had to take the fight to the enemy in order to win. When an equally combative Union general--Ulysses S. Grant--took command of northern forces in 1864, Lee was defeated.

A Glorious Army draws on the latest scholarship to provide fresh assessments of Lee; his top commanders Longstreet, Jackson, and Stuart; and a shrewd battle strategy that still offers lessons to military commanders today.

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Grant

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The #1 New York Times bestseller.

New York Times Book Review 10 Best Books of 2017

Pulitzer Prize winner Ron Chernow returns with a sweeping and dramatic portrait of one of our most compelling generals and presidents, Ulysses S. Grant.

Ulysses S. Grant's life has typically been misunderstood. All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and an inept businessman, or as the triumphant but brutal Union general of the Civil War. But these stereotypes don't come close to capturing him, as Chernow shows in his masterful biography, the first to provide a complete understanding of the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency.

Before the Civil War, Grant was flailing. His business ventures had ended dismally, and despite distinguished service in the Mexican War he ended up resigning from the army in disgrace amid recurring accusations of drunkenness. But in war, Grant began to realize his remarkable potential, soaring through the ranks of the Union army, prevailing at the battle of Shiloh and in the Vicksburg campaign, and ultimately defeating the legendary Confederate general Robert E. Lee. Along the way, Grant endeared himself to President Lincoln and became his most trusted general and the strategic genius of the war effort. Grant's military fame translated into a two-term presidency, but one plagued by corruption scandals involving his closest staff members.

More important, he sought freedom and justice for black Americans, working to crush the Ku Klux Klan and earning the admiration of Frederick Douglass, who called him "the vigilant, firm, impartial, and wise protector of my race." After his presidency, he was again brought low by a dashing young swindler on Wall Street, only to resuscitate his image by working with Mark Twain to publish his memoirs, which are recognized as a masterpiece of the genre.

With lucidity, breadth, and meticulousness, Chernow finds the threads that bind these disparate stories together, shedding new light on the man whom Walt Whitman described as "nothing heroic... and yet the greatest hero." Chernow's probing portrait of Grant's lifelong struggle with alcoholism transforms our understanding of the man at the deepest level. This is America's greatest biographer, bringing movingly to life one of our finest but most underappreciated presidents. The definitive biography, Grant is a grand synthesis of painstaking research and literary brilliance that makes sense of all sides of Grant's life, explaining how this simple Midwesterner could at once be so ordinary and so extraordinary.

Named one of the best books of the year by Goodreads - Amazon - The New York Times - Newsday - BookPage - Barnes and Noble - Wall Street Journal

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Gray Ghost The Life of Col. John Singleton Mosby

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Confederate John Singleton Mosby forged his reputation on the most exhilarating of military activities: the overnight raid. Mosby possessed a genius for guerrilla and psychological warfare, taking control of the dark to make himself the "Gray Ghost" of Union nightmares. Gray Ghost, the first full biography of Confederate raider John Mosby, reveals new information on every aspect of Mosby's life, providing the first analysis of his impact on the Civil War from the Union viewpoint.
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Great Partnership: Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, and the Fate of the Confederacy

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The story of the unique relationship between Lee and Jackson, two leaders who chiseled a strategic path forward against the odds and almost triumphed.

Why were Generals Lee and Jackson so successful in their partner- ship in trying to win the war for the South? What was it about their styles, friendship, even their faith, that cemented them together into a fighting machine that consistently won despite often overwhelming odds against them?

The Great Partnership has the power to change how we think about Confederate strategic decision-making and the value of personal relationships among senior leaders responsible for organizational survival. Those relationships in the Confederate high command were particularly critical for victory, especially the one that existed between the two great Army of Northern Virginia generals.

It has been over two decades since any author attempted a joint study of the two generals. At the very least, the book will inspire a very lively debate among the thousands of students of Civil War his- tory. At best, it will significantly revise how we evaluate Confederate strategy during the height the war and our understanding of why, in the end, the South lost.

Hardtack & Coffee

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First published more than 100 years ago, Hardtack And Coffee is John Billings’ absorbing first-person account of the everyday life of a U.S. Army soldier during the Civil War. Billings attended a reunion of Civil War veterans in 1881 that brought together a group of survivors whose memories and stories of the war compelled him to write this account.In this unique account, we are given the first-hand account of life as a Massachusetts soldier, from conscription and training through to camp-life at discipline. ‘Hard Tack and Coffee’ is a gripping military memoir that promises to deliver a new insight into the Civil War.

Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology The Challenge of Change

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Focusing on the day-to-day operations of the U.S. armory at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, from 1798 to 1861, this book shows what the "new technology" of mechanized production meant in terms of organization, management, and worker morale. A local study of much more than local significance, it highlights the major problems of technical innovation and social adaptation in antebellum America.

Merritt Roe Smith describes how positions of authority at the armory were tied to a larger network of political and economic influence in the community; how these relationships, in turn, affected managerial behavior; and how local social conditions reinforced the reactions of decision makers. He also demonstrates how craft traditions and variant attitudes toward work vis-à-vis New England created an atmosphere in which the machine was held suspect and inventive activity was hampered.

Of central importance is the author's analysis of the drastic differences between Harpers Ferry and its counterpart, the national armory at Springfield, Massachusetts, which played a pivotal role in the emergence of the new technology. The flow of technical information between the two armories, he shows, moved in one direction only― north to south. "In the end," Smith concludes, "the stamina of local culture is paramount in explaining why the Harpers Ferry armory never really flourished as a center of technological innovation."

Pointing up the complexities of industrial change, this account of the Harpers Ferry experience challenges the commonly held view that Americans have always been eagerly receptive to new technological advances.

Hiker's Guide to Civil War Trails in the Mid-Atlantic Region

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Hiker's Guide to Civil War Trails in the Mid-Atlantic Region includes 27 day-hikes around battlefields, along lines of march, and through defensive works. Each hike is accompanied by a simple but clear topo map and trail description as well as historical information about the events that happened along the path the hike follows and the significance of those events.