Art, Photograh, Pictorials

Images of America African Americans of Jefferson County

Images of America African Americans of Jefferson County
$21.99
Jefferson County can proudly claim a large number of firsts when it comes to African Americans in national history. The raid to free slaves that served as a catalyst for the Civil War was led by abolitionist John Brown in Harpers Ferry. The first man wounded in the rebellion was Heyward Shepherd, a free African American and a Jefferson County resident. Pres. Abraham Lincoln appointed Jefferson County native Martin Robison Delany as the first African American field officer of the Civil War. In 1906, the Niagara Movement, forerunner to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), held its first meeting on American soil on the Storer College campus. The first woman to become the coach of a menÂ’s college basketball team was also an African American from Jefferson County. Additionally, the Colored Horse Show held in Charles Town was the first of its kind for African Americans.
Author: 
Inc. Jefferson County Black History Preservation Society
Publication Date: 
2009-07-29

Harpers Ferry A Crossroads in Time

Harpers Ferry A Crossroads in Time
$24.95

With contemporary photography and words, this handsome and groundbreaking book explores the cultural and natural history of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, and the surrounding landscape within Harpers Ferry National Historic Park. More than just a collection of photographs, the book chronicles the history of the area. Best known for John Brown s 1859 raid, the Ferry occupied a strategic location between the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers where Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia meet, making it an important 19th-century crossroads for river, canal, and railroad transportation. The book explores that bustling bygone era, including the Civil War years, which brought an end to the town s industrial age. Moreover, the book portrays the present-day town and the area s scenic attractions, including the rivers and the Appalachian Trail, which passes through the park."

Author: 
Kirby, Jim
Publication Date: 
2009-06-01
Author: 

Landscapes for the People George Alexander Grant First Chief Photographer of the National Park Service

Landscapes for the People George Alexander Grant First Chief Photographer of the National Park Service
$39.95

George Alexander Grant is an unknown elder in the field of American landscape photography. Just as they did the work of his contemporaries Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Eliot Porter, and others, millions of people viewed Grant s photographs; unlike those contemporaries, few even knew Grant s name. Landscapes for the People shares his story through his remarkable images and a compelling biography profiling patience, perseverance, dedication, and an unsurpassed love of the natural and historic places that Americans chose to preserve.

A Pennsylvania native, Grant was introduced to the parks during the summer of 1922 and resolved to make parks work and photography his life. Seven years later, he received his dream job and spent the next quarter century visiting the four corners of the country to produce images in more than one hundred national parks, monuments, historic sites, battlefields, and other locations. He was there to visually document the dramatic expansion of the National Park Service during the New Deal, including the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps.

Grant s images are the work of a master craftsman. His practiced eye for composition and exposure and his patience to capture subjects in their finest light are comparable to those of his more widely known contemporaries. Nearly fifty years after his death, and in concert with the 2016 centennial of the National Park Service, it is fitting that George Grant s photography be introduced to a new generation of Americans."

Author: 
Davis, Helen
Publication Date: 
2015-09-01
Author: 

Upper Potomac in the Civil War

Upper Potomac in the Civil War
$15.95

Derived from a 1965 Publication of the District of Columbia Civil War Centennial Commission.


Today, the Upper Potomac Valley boasts an idyllic landscape where an indomitable river winds through quaint historic towns, rolling farmlands, and mountain vistas. Between 1859 and 1865, this was a scene of war. Battles, skirmishes, daring raids, and dangerous escapes rattled the usually peaceful region. Great armies, blue and gray, crossed the Potomac River numerous times as war shifted back and forth over this natural boundary that separated the North and South.


One hundred years later, Washington, D.C. artist Garnet W. Jex combined his love of history and natural beauty to interpret these events in a stunning collection of fifty-one opaque watercolor paintings. The paintings are presented here in full color to commemorate the Civil War Sesquicentennial and to reveal in vivid detail the dramatic events that unfolded along the banks of the mighty river.

Paperback, 56 pages

Published by the Harpers Ferry HIstorical Associaion

The artwork in this book was originally published as one of several sections in "Study in Patriotism, 1861-1865" as part of the DC centennial celebration in 1965.
Author: 
Jex, Garnet W
Publication Date: 
2013-01-01
Author: