African American History

Family Tree of R&B: America's Popular Music from Jamestown to James Brown

Family Tree of R&B: America's Popular Music from Jamestown to James Brown

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The Family Tree of R&B documents how America's pools of regional music overflowed in the mid-20th century to merge into rhythm and blues. Within the span of a lifetime, R&B sprouted from its ethnic roots to become the predominant popular music of the entire world. Author: Ed Maliskas. Publisher: Hamilton Run Press. Paperback, 118 pages. Measures 6.25" x 9". Weighs: 6.6 oz.
Five for Freedom: The African American Soldiers in John Brown's Army

Five for Freedom: The African American Soldiers in John Brown's Army

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On October 16, 1859, John Brown and his band of eighteen raiders descended on Harpers Ferry. In an ill-fated attempt to incite a slave insurrection, they seized the federal arsenal, took hostages, and retreated to a fire engine house where they barricaded themselves until a contingent of US Marines battered their way in on October 18. The raiders were routed, and several were captured. Soon after, they were tried, convicted, and hanged. Among Brown's fighters were five African American men--John Copeland, Shields Green, Dangerfield Newby, Lewis Leary, and Osborne Perry Anderson--whose lives and deaths have long been overshadowed by their martyred leader and who, even today, are little remembered. Only Anderson survived, later publishing the lone insider account of the event that, most historians agree, was a catalyst to the catastrophic American Civil War that followed. Five for Freedom is the story of these five brave men, the circumstances in which they were born and raised, how they came together at this fateful time and place, and the legacies they left behind. It is an American story that continues to resonate. Author: Eugene L. Meyer. Publisher: Lawrence Hill Books. Hardcover, 282 pages. Measures 6.25" x 9.25" x 1". Weighs 1 lb. 6 oz.
Frederick Douglass on Slavery and the Civil War

Frederick Douglass on Slavery and the Civil War

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A former slave, self-taught writer, editor, and public servant, Frederick Douglass was also among the foremost leaders of the abolitionist movement. Recognized as one of the first great African-American speakers in the United States, Douglass was an advisor to President Lincoln during the Civil War and fought for the adoption of constitutional amendments that guaranteed voting rights and other civil liberties for blacks.This book includes representative selections from the speeches and writings of this great statesman, with topics focusing on the slave trade, the Civil War, suffrage for African-Americans, reconstruction in the South, and other vital issues. A powerful voice for human rights throughout much of the 19th century, Douglass remains highly respected today for his fight against racial injustice. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 69 pages. Measures 5" x 8"x0.4". Weighs 2.5 oz. 
Freedom in My Heart: Voices from the United States National Slavery Museum

Freedom in My Heart: Voices from the United States National Slavery Museum

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Unlike any other book on the market today, this richly illustrated companion volume uses the remarkable artifacts, images, and documents of the United States National Slavery Museum to trace the entire history of slavery in North America, from the societies of ancient Africa to the repercussions still faced by Americans today--and to celebrate the perseverance and ultimate triumph of a people. Freedom in My Heart goes beyond the textbooks to call forth the unique voices, personal stories, and cultural contributions of slaves and their descendants, demonstrating how enslaved African Americans remained free at heart to develop a vibrant culture in the face of unspeakable inhumanity. Following a foreword by L. Douglas Wilder, the grandson of former slaves and the first African-American elected governor of a U.S. state, ten compelling chapters offer the often unheard testimony of those who witnessed slavery and those whose ancestors endured it. Their voices blend with the contributions of such luminaries as South African leader Nelson Mandela, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, noted journalist Juan Williams, entertainers Bill Cosby and Ben Vereen, and many more. This partnership with the National Slavery Museum grants exclusive access to never-before-seen images, personal letters, and artifacts, which shed new light on slavery and the activities surrounding it. As the museum nears its opening, numerous press events and online features will publicize the book, giving unprecedented exposure at a time of great anticipation and interest. Edited by Cynthia Jacobs Carter. Foreword by L. Douglas Wilder. Publisher: National Geographic. Hardcover, 255 pages. Measures 9.5" x 11"x0.75". Weighs: 2 lb. 13.4 oz.
Great Speeches by African Americans

Great Speeches by African Americans

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Tracing the struggle for freedom and civil rights across two centuries, this anthology comprises speeches by Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and other influential figures in the history of African-American culture and politics. The collection begins with Henry Highland Garnet's 1843 "An Address to the Slaves of the United States of America," followed by Jermain Wesley Loguen's "I Am a Fugitive Slave," the famous "Ain't I a Woman?" speech by Sojourner Truth, and Frederick Douglass's immortal "What, to the Slave, Is the Fourth of July?" Subsequent orators include John Sweat Rock, John M. Langston, James T. Rapier, Alexander Crummell, Booker T. Washington, Mary Church Terrell, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Francis J. Grimké, Marcus Garvey, and Mary McLeod Bethune. Martin Luther King, Jr., 's "I Have a Dream" speech appears here, along with Malcolm X's "The Ballot or The Bullet," Shirley Chisholm's "The Black Woman in Contemporary America," "The Constitution: A Living Document" by Thurgood Marshall, and Barack Obama's "Knox College Commencement Address."  Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 150 pages. Measures 5" x 8" x 0.4". Weighs 4.5 oz.
Great Speeches by Frederick Douglass

Great Speeches by Frederick Douglass

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Author, abolitionist, political activist, and philosopher, Frederick Douglass was a pivotal figure in the decades of struggle leading up to the Civil War and the Reconstruction era. This inexpensive compilation of his speeches adds vital detail to the portrait of a great historical figure. Featured addresses include "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" which was delivered on July 5, 1852, more than ten years before the Emancipation Proclamation. "Had I the ability, and could reach the nation's ear, I would, today, pour out a fiery stream of biting ridicule, blasting reproach, withering sarcasm, and stern rebuke," Douglass assured his listeners, "For it is not light that is needed, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake." Other eloquent and dramatic orations include "Self-Made Men," first delivered in 1859, which defines the principles behind individual success, and "The Church and Prejudice," delivered at the Plymouth County Anti-Slavery Society in 1841. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 152 Pages. Measures 8"x5"x0.5" . Weighs 4.3 oz
Guanya Pau A Story of an African American Princess

Guanya Pau: A Story of an African American Princess

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The first book of long fiction by an African to be published in English, this novel tells the story of a young woman of the Vai people in Liberia. Guanya Pau, betrothed as a child to a much older, polygamous man, flees her home rahter than be forced into marriage, and the novel recounts her subsequent efforts to reach the Christian community where the man she loves awaits her. Author: Joseph Jeffrey Walters. Publisher: Broadview Press. Paperback, 205 pages. Measures 5.5" x 8.5" x 0.5". Weighs 9.7 oz.
Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad (Graphic Library Series)

Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad (Graphic Library Series)

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Tells the story of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. Written in graphic-novel format. Publisher: Capstone Press. Paperback, 32 pages. Measures 6.75" x 9"x0.125". Weighs 3.2 oz.
Heroes of the Underground Railroad Around Washington, DC

Heroes of the Underground Railroad Around Washington, DC

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Many of the unsung heroes of the Underground Railroad lived and worked in Washington, D.C. Men and women, black and white, operatives and freedom seekers - all demonstrated courage, resourcefulness and initiative. Leonard Grimes, a free African American, was arrested for transporting enslaved people to freedom. John Dean, a white lawyer, used the District courts to test the legality of the Fugitive Slave Act. Anna Maria Weems dressed as a boy in order to escape to Canada. Enslaved people engineered escapes, individually and in groups, with and without the assistance of an organized network. Some ended up back in slavery or in jail, but some escaped to freedom. Anthropologist and author Jenny Masur tells their stories. Publisher: History Press. Paperback, 189 pages. Measures 6" x 9" x 0.5". Weighs 14.3 oz.
HFNHP African American History Bookmark
HFNHP African American History Bookmark

HFNHP African American History Bookmark

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Bookmark featuring a design of the Lockwood House and information about African American history in Harpers Ferry. Gloss cover. Measures 7" x 2.25".