Civil Rights & Niagara Movement

F.H.M. Murray First Biography of a Forgotten Pioneer for Civil Justice

$15.00
More Info
Co-founder of the Niagara Movement (the first civil rights movement of the twentieth century) at Harpers Ferry, Freeman Henry Morris Murray was an African American activist for civil rights who risked his life and the lives of others to fight for what he knew would lead to the advancement of his people. He was a successful and knowledgeable man and this biography details his many talents based on years of research and family interviews. Paperback, 288 pages. 

In the Watchfires: The Loudoun County Emancipation Association, 1890-1971

$12.00
More Info

Niagara Movement Commemoration Pin

$2.00
More Info

Niagara Movement Commemorative Program

$2.50
More Info
Issued during the August 2006 event on the Storer College campus, this program gives you a history of the formation of the Niagara Movement. Listed is the daily schedule for the three day event along with biographies and colored photographs of the honored guests, speakers and performers. Paperback, 20 pages.

Niagara Movement Educator's Guide CD-ROM

$5.00
More Info
Explore the meaning of the Niagara Movement and it's historic meeting at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.

Niagara Movement Lapel Pin with Ribbon

$2.95
More Info
This ribbon replicates the ribbons worn in 1906 by the Niagarites. Both pin and ribbon commemorate the Niagara Movement centennial August 18-20, 2006. Ribbon measures approximately 6”x2”. The lapel pin measures 1” diameter.

Niagara Movement Postcard

$0.50
More Info

Niagara Movement Silver Medallion

$34.95
More Info
This is a custom medallion encased in plastic from the Northwest Territorial Mint which comes with a certificate of authenticity that lists the specifications of the following: *Assay .999 Fine Silver *Weight 1 troy Ounce*Size 39mm*Thickness 2.9mm*Strike ProofA velvet lined case for safe keeping is included.

Niagara Unframed Photograph 11x14

$24.95
More Info
Photographed August 20, 2006, on the third day of celebration to honor those who had gathered 100 years before.This photograph was taken to memorialize the centennial of the Niagara Movement in Harpers Ferry, WV. Those that gathered to have their picture taken were duplicating what the original members had done during their 1906 conference. Available unframed size 11” x 14”.

Niagara Unframed Photograph 8x10

$19.95
More Info
Photographed August 20, 2006, on the third day of celebration to honor those who had gathered 100 years before.This photograph was taken to memorialize the centennial of the Niagara Movement in Harpers Ferry, WV. Those that gathered to have their picture taken were duplicating what the original members had done during their 1906 conference. Available unframed size 8” x 10”

Sage of Tawawa Reverdy Cassius Ransom, 1861-1959

$21.00
More Info
In The Sage of Tawawa, Annetta L. Gomez-Jefferson offers Ransom as a symbol of an era and a larger movement and recalls him to be a man of deep faith and conviction. Educated at Wilberforce University in Ohio (after losing his scholarship from Oberlin College for protesting the segregation of the campus dining halls), Reverdy Cassius Ransom worked with and for the African Methodist Episcopal Church. His duties saw him run for Congress, be elected bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, serve as editor of the A.M.E. Church Review, and serve as church historiographer. In July 1941, Ransom received a letter from President Roosevelt appointing him to the Volunteer Participation Committee in the Office of Civilian Defense.

Stories from West Virginia's Civil Rights History: A New Home for Liberty

$7.95
More Info
Why do we call West Virginia "A New Home for Liberty?" What did West Virginia have to do about slavery, in order to become a State in 1863? How did a jury in Tucker County, WV strike a blow for racial equality in the 1890s? Who are the West Virginia heroes J.R. Clifford, Granville Hall, Carrie Williams, and Gordon Battelle and why do we admire them? You can learn the answers to these questions and lots more in this exciting book of stories from West Virginia's civil rights history. The first story in the new book is titled "A New Home for Liberty," and describes the creation of West Virginia through the life of the abolitionist and statehood leader Granville Davisson Hall (1837-1934). Before the Civil War, Hall's father, a tanner in the Harrison County Town of Shinnston (then a part of Virginia), was indicted for distributing anti-slavery literature. The book's second story, "J.R. Clifford and the Carrie Williams Case," tells how Carrie Williams, an African American teacher in a segregated Tucker County school at the head of the Blackwater Canyon, won a landmark equal rights case in the 1890s before the West Virginia Supreme Court. Williams' lawyer was John Robert(J.R.)Clifford, (1848-1933), the State's first African American attorney. As a teenager, Clifford fought for the Union Army in the Civil War, and he is also a character in the "New Home for Liberty" story.