African American History

Images of America African Americans of Jefferson County

Images of America African Americans of Jefferson County
$21.99
Jefferson County can proudly claim a large number of firsts when it comes to African Americans in national history. The raid to free slaves that served as a catalyst for the Civil War was led by abolitionist John Brown in Harpers Ferry. The first man wounded in the rebellion was Heyward Shepherd, a free African American and a Jefferson County resident. Pres. Abraham Lincoln appointed Jefferson County native Martin Robison Delany as the first African American field officer of the Civil War. In 1906, the Niagara Movement, forerunner to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), held its first meeting on American soil on the Storer College campus. The first woman to become the coach of a menÂ’s college basketball team was also an African American from Jefferson County. Additionally, the Colored Horse Show held in Charles Town was the first of its kind for African Americans.
Author: 
Inc. Jefferson County Black History Preservation Society
Publication Date: 
2009-07-29

Sage of Tawawa Reverdy Cassius Ransom, 1861-1959

Sage of Tawawa Reverdy Cassius Ransom, 1861-1959
$21.00
In The Sage of Tawawa, Annetta L. Gomez-Jefferson offers Ransom as a symbol of an era and a larger movement and recalls him to be a man of deep faith and conviction. Educated at Wilberforce University in Ohio (after losing his scholarship from Oberlin College for protesting the segregation of the campus dining halls), Reverdy Cassius Ransom worked with and for the African Methodist Episcopal Church. His duties saw him run for Congress, be elected bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, serve as editor of the A.M.E. Church Review, and serve as church historiographer. In July 1941, Ransom received a letter from President Roosevelt appointing him to the Volunteer Participation Committee in the Office of Civilian Defense.
Author: 
Annetta Louise Gomez-Jefferson
Publication Date: 
2003-01-15

Encyclopedia of African American History 3 Volume Set

Encyclopedia of African American History 3 Volume Set
$50.00
It is impossible to understand America without understanding the history of African Americans. In nearly seven hundred entries, the Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619-1895 documents the full range of the African American experience during that period - from the arrival of the first slave ship to the death of Frederick Douglass - and shows how all aspects of American culture, history, and national identity have been profoundly influenced by the experience of African Americans.
The Encyclopedia covers an extraordinary range of subjects. Major topics such as "Abolitionism," "Black Nationalism," the "Civil War," the "Dred Scott case," "Reconstruction," "Slave Rebellions and Insurrections," the "Underground Railroad," and "Voting Rights" are given the in-depth treatment one would expect. But the encyclopedia also contains hundreds of fascinating entries on less obvious subjects, such as the "African Grove Theatre," "Black Seafarers," "Buffalo Soldiers," the "Catholic Church and African Americans," "Cemeteries and Burials," "Gender," "Midwifery," "New York African Free Schools," "Oratory and Verbal Arts," "Religion and Slavery," the "Secret Six," and much more. In addition, the Encyclopedia offers brief biographies of important African Americans - as well as white Americans who have played a significant role in African American history - from Crispus Attucks, John Brown, and Henry Ward Beecher to Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, Sarah Grimke, Sojourner Truth, Nat Turner, Phillis Wheatley, and many others.
All of the Encyclopedia's alphabetically arranged entries are accessibly written and free of jargon and technical terms. To facilitate ease of use, many composite entries gather similar topics under one headword. The entry for Slave Narratives, for example, includes three subentries: The Slave Narrative in America from the Colonial Period to the Civil War, Interpreting Slave Narratives, and African and British Slave Narratives. A headnote detailing the various subentries introduces each composite entry. Selective bibliographies and cross-references appear at the end of each article to direct readers to related articles within the Encyclopedia and to primary sources and scholarly works beyond it. A topical outline, chronology of major events, nearly 300 black and white illustrations, and comprehensive index further enhance the work's usefulness.
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Publication Date: 
2006-03-31

Frederick Douglass An American Life DVD

Frederick Douglass An American Life DVD
$19.95

This film is a documentary that explores the life and times of a fugitive African American slave who becomes an eloquent orator and spokesman against slavery. Also, re-enacted is his friendship with William Llyod Garrison and John Brown.

Running time: 32 minutes. Bonus films on this DVD include Longing to Learn: Booker T. Washington's Story, Booker T. Washington: The Life and the Legacy, and The Maggie Lena Walker Story.

Longing to Learn Booker T. Washington's Story DVD

Longing to Learn Booker T. Washington's Story DVD
$19.95

This film is based in Washington's autobiography "Up from Slavery". It draws on his own words to describe his boyhood years as an African American in a Virginia slave hut. He tells of the struggle for his much-valued education and his disadvantaged childhood.

Running time: 15 minutes. Bonus films on this DVD include Booker T. Washington: The Life and the Legacy, Frederick Douglass: An American Life, and The Maggie Lena Walker Story.

 

Maggie Lena Walker Story DVD

Maggie Lena Walker Story DVD
$19.95

This narrated film captures the spirit of a woman who became a prominent civic leader, financier, and business woman during the early twentieth century. Original photographs and quotations from her early writings reveal the depth of her commitment to the social, economic, and cultural needs of African Americans.

Running time: 12 minutes. Bonus films on this DVD include Longing to Learn: Booker T. Washington's Story, Booker T. Washington: The Life and the Legacy, and Frederick Douglass: An American Life.

Righteous Discontent The Women's Movement in the Black Baptist Church, 1880-1920

Righteous Discontent The Women's Movement in the Black Baptist Church, 1880-1920
$16.95

What Du Bois noted has gone largely unstudied until now. In this book, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham gives us our first full account of the crucial role of black women in making the church a powerful institution for social and political change in the black community. Between 1880 and 1920, the black church served as the most effective vehicle by which men and women alike, pushed down by racism and poverty, regrouped and rallied against emotional and physical defeat. Focusing on the National Baptist Convention, the largest religious movement among black Americans, Higginbotham shows us how women were largely responsible for making the church a force for self-help in the black community. In her account, we see how the efforts of women enabled the church to build schools, provide food and clothing to the poor, and offer a host of social welfare services. And we observe the challenges of black women to patriarchal theology. Class, race, and gender dynamics continually interact in Higginbotham's nuanced history. She depicts the cooperation, tension, and negotiation that characterized the relationship between men and women church leaders as well as the interaction of southern black and northern white women's groups.

Higginbotham's history is at once tough-minded and engaging. It portrays the lives of individuals within this movement as lucidly as it delineates feminist thinking and racial politics. She addresses the role of black Baptist women in contesting racism and sexism through a "politics of respectability" and in demanding civil rights, voting rights, equal employment, and educational opportunities.

Righteous Discontent finally assigns women their rightful place in the story of political and social activism in the black church. It is central to an understanding of African American social and cultural life and a critical chapter in the history of religion in America.

Author: 
Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham
Publication Date: 
1994-03-15

Bound for the Promised Land African American Religion and the Great Migration

Bound for the Promised Land African American Religion and the Great Migration
$16.95
Bound for the Promised Land is the first extensive examination of the impact on the American religious landscape of the Great Migration—the movement from South to North and from country to city by hundreds of thousands of African Americans following World War I. In focusing on this phenomenon’s religious and cultural implications, Milton C. Sernett breaks with traditional patterns of historiography that analyze the migration in terms of socioeconomic considerations.
Drawing on a range of sources—interviews, government documents, church periodicals, books, pamphlets, and articles—Sernett shows how the mass migration created an institutional crisis for black religious leaders. He describes the creative tensions that resulted when the southern migrants who saw their exodus as the Second Emancipation brought their religious beliefs and practices into northern cities such as Chicago, and traces the resulting emergence of the belief that black churches ought to be more than places for "praying and preaching." Explaining how this social gospel perspective came to dominate many of the classic studies of African American religion, Bound for the Promised Land sheds new light on various components of the development of black religion, including philanthropic endeavors to "modernize" the southern black rural church. In providing a balanced and holistic understanding of black religion in post–World War I America, Bound for the Promised Land serves to reveal the challenges presently confronting this vital component of America’s religious mosaic.
Author: 
Milton C. Sernett
Publication Date: 
1997-10-13

F.H.M. Murray First Biography of a Forgotten Pioneer for Civil Justice

F.H.M. Murray First Biography of a Forgotten Pioneer for Civil Justice
$15.00

Co-founder of the Niagara Movement (the first civil rights movement of the twentieth century) at Harpers Ferry, Freeman Henry Morris Murray was an African American activist for civil rights who risked his life and the lives of others to fight for what he knew would lead to the advancement of his people. He was a successful and knowledgeable man and this biography details his many talents based on years of research and family interviews. Paperback, 288 pages.

 

Author: 
Anita Hackley-Lambert
Publication Date: 
1997-01-01

Partners to History Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph David Abernathy and the Civil Rights Movement

Partners to History Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph David Abernathy and the Civil Rights Movement
$12.95

Ralph David Abernathy and Martin Luther King Jr. were inseparable and together helped to establish what would become the modern American Civil Rights Movement. They preached, marched, and were frequently jailed together. Donzaleigh Abernathy, Ralph’s youngest daughter, has written Partners to History as a testament to the courage, strength, and endurance of these men who stirred a nation with their moral fortitude. She also pays tribute to the thousands of unsung heroes—the other partners to this history—who were foot soldiers in the endless struggle for freedom, justice, and equality. This document captures in words and pictures how the dream of two visionaries changed the course of American history and inspired the world.

Partners to History is a unique look at a troubling time, and its usage of dramatic—and personal—photographs, combined with the voices of King and Abernathy, seamlessly conveys the fears, frustrations, and pain of the long days and nights spent planning the many crusades. Donzaleigh Abernathy’s recollections provide personal insight from someone who lived through the tumult and witnessed firsthand the relationship of these lifelong friends. “People didn’t know Daddy and Uncle Martin,” she writes. “They know the legends. They don’t know the fathers, the husbands, the men, the human beings. I feel obliged to tell the beautiful stories of these beautiful men I lived with and loved.”

Chronicling the crucial events of the movement, from the early strategy sessions in the homes of integrationists and the Montgomery Bus Boycott to Birmingham, the Freedom Riders, and the March on Washington, the author provides a unique insider’s perspective. With heart-wrenching precision, she lays bare the horrifying deaths of four little girls in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church and follows the search for three murdered civil rights workers in Philadelphia, Mississippi. She goes behind the scenes to the intimate moments and reveals the determination of two families caught up in the fight for equal rights.

King and Abernathy believed in a cause and laid their lives on the line time and time again, knowing deep in their hearts that they were working not only for their people, but for the good of all humankind. When, on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, Ralph David Abernathy vowed to persevere and continue their dream, knowing that people could not be free until the walls came tumbling down.

Inspirational and beautifully illustrated, Partners to History reveals the remarkable relationship between two great leaders and serves as a reminder and tribute to this tumultuous era.

Author: 
Donzaleigh Abernathy
Publication Date: 
2003-10-14
Publisher: