African American History

Encyclopedia of African American History, 3 Volume Set

Encyclopedia of African American History, 3 Volume Set

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It is impossible to understand America without understanding the history of African Americans. In nearly seven hundred entries, the Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619-1895 documents the full range of the African American experience during that period - from the arrival of the first slave ship to the death of Frederick Douglass - and shows how all aspects of American culture, history, and national identity have been profoundly influenced by the experience of African Americans. The Encyclopedia covers an extraordinary range of subjects. Major topics such as Abolitionism, Black Nationalism, the Civil War, the Dred Scott case, Reconstruction, Slave Rebellions and Insurrections, the Underground Railroad, and Voting Rights are given the in-depth treatment one would expect. But the encyclopedia also contains hundreds of fascinating entries on less obvious subjects, such as the African Grove Theatre, Black Seafarers, Buffalo Soldiers, the Catholic Church and African Americans, Cemeteries and Burials, Gender, Midwifery, New York African Free Schools, Oratory and Verbal Arts, Religion and Slavery, the Secret Six, and much more. In addition, the Encyclopedia offers brief biographies of important African Americans - as well as white Americans who have played a significant role in African American history - from Crispus Attucks, John Brown, and Henry Ward Beecher to Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, Sarah Grimké, Sojourner Truth, Nat Turner, Phillis Wheatley, and many others. All of the Encyclopedia's alphabetically arranged entries are accessibly written and free of jargon and technical terms. To facilitate ease of use, many composite entries gather similar topics under one headword. The entry for Slave Narratives, for example, includes three subentries: The SlaveNarrative in America from the Colonial Period to the Civil War, Interpreting Slave Narratives, and African and British Slave Narratives. A headnote detailing the various subentries introduces each composite entry. Selective bibliographies and cross-references appear at the end of each article to direct readers to related articles within the Encyclopedia and to primary sources and scholarly works beyond it. A topical outline, chronology of major events, nearly 300 black and white illustrations, and comprehensive index further enhance the work's usefulness. Publisher: Oxford University Press. Each volume is hardcover, measures 8.5" x 11.25" x 1.6", and weighs 3 lb 6.1 oz. Volume 1: 490 pages, Volume 2: 543 pages, Volume 3: 490 pages.
"To Emancipate the Mind and Soul": Storer College 1867-1955

"To Emancipate the Mind and Soul": Storer College 1867-1955

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When John Brown came to Harpers Ferry in 1859, organizing a school for enslaved African Americans was illegal. Eight years later, after a bloody Civil War, Storer College did just that—and more. To honor the 150th anniversary of the school’s founding, Harpers Ferry Park Association, in partnership with Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, invited park rangers, professors, journalists, and scholars to tell the stories of the teachers, students, and reformers who strove to manifest a new world on the “hill of hope.” This collection reveals tales of courage and conviction, success and defeat, controversy and, above all, hope. Publisher: Harpers Ferry Park Association. Paperback, 176 pages. Measures 6" x 9" x 0.3". Weighs 10.5 oz.
African American Medicine in Washington, D.C.: Healing the Capital During the Civil War Era

African American Medicine in Washington, D.C.: Healing the Capital During the Civil War Era

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The service of African Americans in defense of the Union during the Civil War required African American nurses, doctors and surgeons to heal those soldiers. In the nation's capital, these brave healthcare workers created a medical infrastructure for African Americans by African Americans. Preeminent surgeon Alexander T. Augusta fought discrimination, visited President Lincoln, testified before Congress and aided the war effort. Washington's Freedmen's Hospital was formed to serve the District's growing free African American population, eventually becoming the Howard University Medical Center. These physicians would form the National Medical Association, the largest and oldest organization representing African American doctors and patients. Author Heather M. Butts recounts the heroic lives and work of Washington's African American medical community during the Civil War. Publisher: The History Press. Paperback, 153 pages. Measures 6" x 9" x 0.3". Weighs 12.1 oz. 
All Different Now

All Different Now: Juneteenth, the First Day of Freedom

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Experience the joy of Juneteenth in this celebration of freedom from the award-winning team of Angela Johnson and E.B. Lewis. Through the eyes of one little girl, All Different Now tells the story of the first Juneteenth, the day freedom finally came to the last of the slaves in the South. Since then, the observance of June 19 as African American Emancipation Day has spread across the United States and beyond. This stunning picture book includes notes from the author and illustrator, a timeline of important dates, and a glossary of relevant terms. Told in Angela Johnson's signature melodic style and brought to life by E.B. Lewis's striking paintings, All Different Now is a joyous portrait of the dawn breaking on the darkest time in our nation's history. Author: Angela Johnson. Illustrator: E. B. Lewis. Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. Hardcover, 40 pages. Measures: 11.25" x 9.25". Weighs: 15.7 oz. 
Allies for Freedom & Blacks on John Brown

Allies for Freedom & Blacks on John Brown

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John Brown is an endlessly fascinating historical figure. Here are two classic studies by a pioneer in African American studies, one about the place of John Brown in African American history, the other about the reasons for the unique esteem in which he has been held by successive generations of blacks.This two-in-one edition features a new introduction by William S. McFeely, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Grant: A Biography. Author: Benjamin Quarles. Publisher: Da Capo Press. Paperback, 164 pages. Measures 5" x 8"x1.25". Weighs: 12.2 oz.
American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era

American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era

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"The ghosts of the Civil War never leave us, as David Blight knows perhaps better than anyone, and in this superb book he masterfully unites two distant but inextricably bound events."―Ken Burns Standing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963, a century after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, Martin Luther King, Jr., declared, "One hundred years later, the Negro still is not free." He delivered this speech just three years after the Virginia Civil War Commission published a guide proclaiming that "the Centennial is no time for finding fault or placing blame or fighting the issues all over again." David Blight takes his readers back to the centennial celebration to determine how Americans then made sense of the suffering, loss, and liberation that had wracked the United States a century earlier. Amid cold war politics and civil rights protest, four of America's most incisive writers explored the gulf between remembrance and reality. Robert Penn Warren, the southern-reared poet-novelist who recanted his support of segregation; Bruce Catton, the journalist and U.S. Navy officer who became a popular Civil War historian; Edmund Wilson, the century's preeminent literary critic; and James Baldwin, the searing African-American essayist and activist--each exposed America's triumphalist memory of the war. And each, in his own way, demanded a reckoning with the tragic consequences it spawned. Blight illuminates not only mid-twentieth-century America's sense of itself but also the dynamic, ever-changing nature of Civil War memory. On the eve of the 150th anniversary of the war, we have an invaluable perspective on how this conflict continues to shape the country's political debates, national identity, and sense of purpose. Publisher: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. Paperback, 314 pages. Measures 5.5" x 8.5" x 0.75". Weighs 15.7 oz. 
American Phoenix: A History of Storer College from Slavery to Desegregation

American Phoenix: A History of Storer College from Slavery to Desegregation

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In the first book-length study of Storer College, Dawne Raines Burke tells the story of the historically black institution from its Reconstruction origins to its demise in 1955. Established by Northern Baptists in the abolitionist flashpoint of Harpers Ferry, Storer was the first college open to African Americans in West Virginia, and it played a central role in regional and national history. In addition to educating generations of students of all races, genders, and creeds, Storer served as the second meeting place (and the first on U.S. soil) for the Niagara Movement, a precursor to the National Association for the Adavancement of Colored People. An American Phoenix provides a comprehensive and extensively illustrated history of this historically black college, bringing to life not just the institution but many of the individuals who taught or were educated there. It fills a significant gap in our knowledge of African American history and the struggle for rights in West Virginia and the wider world. Publisher: Storer College Books. Hardcover, 151 pages. Measures 11.25" x 0.5" x 9.25". Weighs 35.9 oz.
Before She Was Harriet

Before She Was Harriet

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Who was Harriet Tubman before she was Harriet? We know her today as Harriet Tubman, but in her lifetime she was called by many names. As General Tubman she was a Union spy. As Moses she led hundreds to freedom on the Underground Railroad. As Minty she was a slave whose spirit could not be broken. As Araminta she was a young girl whose father showed her the stars and the first steps on the path to freedom. An evocative poem and stunning watercolors come together to honor a woman of humble origins whose courage and compassion make her a larger than life hero. A lush and lyrical biography of Harriet Tubman, written in verse and illustrated by James Ransome, winner of the Coretta Scott King medal for The Creation. Author: Lesa Cline-Ransome. Illustrator: James E. Ransome. Publisher: Holiday House. Hardcover, 32 pages. Measures: 9.25" x 11.25". Weighs: 14.4 oz. 
Coloring Book - History of the Civil Rights Movement

Coloring Book - History of the Civil Rights Movement

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Thirty full-page illustrations chronicle key events of one of the twentieth century's most important social movements. Informative captions accompany the dramatic scenes, from Lincoln's signing of the Emancipation Proclamation through the movement's struggles and achievements of the 1950s, '60s, and '70s. Publisher: Dover Publications. Paperback, 30 pages. Measures 8.25" x 10.8". Weighs 4.4 oz.
Embattled Freedom: Journey through the Civil War's Refugee Camps

Embattled Freedom: Journey through the Civil War's Refugee Camps

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The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of thousands more followed in a mass exodus from slavery that would destroy the system once and for all. Drawing on an extraordinary survey of slave refugee camps throughout the country, Embattled Freedom reveals as never before the everyday experiences of these refugees from slavery as they made their way through the vast landscape of army-supervised camps that emerged during the war. Amy Murrell Taylor vividly reconstructs the human world of wartime emancipation, taking readers inside military-issued tents and makeshift towns, through commissary warehouses and active combat, and into the realities of individuals and families struggling to survive physically as well as spiritually. Narrating their journeys in and out of the confines of the camps, Taylor shows in often gripping detail how the most basic necessities of life were elemental to a former slave's quest for freedom and full citizenship. The stories of individuals--storekeepers, a laundress, and a minister among them--anchor this ambitious and wide-ranging history and demonstrate with new clarity how contingent the slaves' pursuit of freedom was on the rhythms and culture of military life. Taylor brings new insight into the enormous risks taken by formerly enslaved people to find freedom in the midst of the nation's most destructive war. Publisher: University of North Carolina Press. Paperback, 349 pages. Measures 6" x 9.25" x 0.75". Weighs 1 lb 3.2 oz.